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Acrae  

Arthur Geoffrey Woodhead and R. J. A. Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Acrae (near mod. Palazzolo Acreide), founded by *Syracuse in 663 bce (Thuc. 6. 5. 3), stands on a hill protected by steep cliffs, commanding the westward route from the Syracusan plain. ... More

Acraephnium  

John Buckler

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Acraephnium (mod. Karditza), city in NE *Boeotia, located above a small bay of Lake *Copais; perhaps the Homeric Arne. Fortifications and cemeteries have been excavated, the latter ... More

Acragas  

Arthur Geoffrey Woodhead and R. J. A. Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Was founded c.580 bce by the Geloans (see gela) in Sican territory in central southern Sicily. One of the most substantial Hellenic cities in size and affluence, it occupied a large bowl of land, ... More

Acrisius  

Herbert Jennings Rose

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Acrisius, in mythology, son of Abas, king of *Argos (1), and his wife Aglaïa, father of *Danaë and brother of *Proetus. After Abas' death the two brothers quarrelled; in their warfare they invented ... More

A Critical Introduction to Arts Behind Bars  

Aylwyn Walsh

Online publication date:
Sep 2017
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Criminology and Criminal Justice
This article proposes a focus on some of the arguments in the field—what is “arts behind bars”? What are some of the intentions, and why would people do it? It also signals the range of ... More

acrostic  

Don P. Fowler and Peta G. Fowler

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Acrostic (Gk. ἀκροστιχίς, ἀκροστίχιον), a word or phrase formed from the initial letters of a number of consecutive lines of verse. Acrostics may occur by chance (Eust. Il. 24. 1; Gell.NA 14. 6. 4; ... More

acta  

John Percy Vyvian Dacre Balsdon and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Acta means ‘the things that have been done’ and has two specialized, overlapping senses in Roman history; one is a gazette, the other is official acts, especially of an emperor.The Acta diurna were a ... More

Actaeon  

Herbert Jennings Rose and Jenny March

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Oxford Classical Dictionary
Actaeon, in mythology son of *Aristaeus and Autonoë, daughter of *Cadmus, and a great huntsman. Ovid gives the most familiar version of his death (Met. 3. 138 ff.): one day on Mt. Cithaeron he came ... More

actio  

Thomas Rüfner

Online publication date:
Nov 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Oxford Classical Dictionary
In Roman law, the word actio refers to a civil lawsuit. At first sight, it seems obvious that actio derives from the verb ago, which has the basic meaning “to drive,” “to urge,” or simply “to act.” ... More

Action Research  

David P. Moxley

Online publication date:
Oct 2013
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Encyclopedia of Social Work
Through cycles of systematic and purposeful iterative engagement with problems they face in specific practice settings, social workers engaging in action research build knowledge that is ... More

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