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  • Greek Material Culture: Classical and Hellenistic x
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stadium  

Richard Allan Tomlinson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Stadium (Greek στάδιον), running track, about 200 m. long (the term also signifies a comparable unit of linear measurement i.e. a ‘stade’; see measures). Athletic activity often antedates the ... More

stoa  

Richard Allan Tomlinson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The name stoa is applied to various types of building, comprising essentially an open colonnade, generally in the Doric order (see orders, architectural), and a roof over the space to a rear ... More

Stoa Poecile  

Karim Arafat

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Known from over 50 literary testimonia, and excavated from 1981, it lies in the NW part of the Athenian Agora; see athens, topography. It measures 12.5 by c.36 m., made of various limestones, with ... More

Stobi  

John Wilkes

Stobi, a strategically located settlement of Paeonia (see macedonia) at the confluence of the Axius (Vardar) and Erigon (Crna Reka), was a Macedonian stronghold by the 2nd cent. bce and in the Roman ... More

symbolon  

Robert J. Hopper and Paul C. Millett

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Symbolon, originally a physical object, intended as a material indication of identification or agreement. What may have begun as a private practice as a reminder of xenia or ritualized friendship ... More

symposium  

Oswyn Murray

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Commensality in Greece was focused both on the public civic or sacrificial meal and on the activities of smaller exclusive groups. The warrior feast was already central to the Homeric image of ... More

Tauriscus (2), sculptor, 1st cent. BCE  

Thomas Bertram Lonsdale Webster

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Tauriscus (2) (1st cent. bce) sculptor, son of Artemidorus, of Tralles. Works (owned by C. *Asinius Pollio): 1. Hermerotes, probably a pair of *herms with bodies and heads of Erotes (see eros). 2. ... More

Tegea  

James Roy

Tegea, a *polis of SE *Arcadia situated in a high upland basin crossed by important routes to *Argos(1), Sparta, and SW and E. Arcadia. The polis was formed from nine local communities, but when an ... More

temple  

Richard Allan Tomlinson

The Greek temple was the house of the god, whose image it contained, usually placed so that at the annual festival it could watch through the open door the burning of the sacrifice at the altar which ... More

terracottas  

Dorothy Burr Thompson and Michael Vickers

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The term properly includes all objects made of fired clay; commonly, pots and household vessels are treated separately. Fabricants (κοροπλάθοι, κοροπλάσται) were originally potters; later they were ... More

theatres, Greek and Roman, structure  

Richard Allan Tomlinson

The Greek theatre consisted essentially of the orchestra, the flat dancing-place for the choral song and dance out of which grew tragedy and comedy; and the auditorium (the theatron proper, Latin ... More

theatre staging, Greek  

J. Richard Green

The visual element in Greek theatre is demonstrably strong from the time of the earliest formal drama; the importance accorded to stage production may be judged from *Aristophanes(1)'s *parodies of ... More

Theodorus (1), Samian architect  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Theodorus (1), Samian architect (see samos), sculptor, and metalworker, active c.550–520 bce. He made two massive silver craters dedicated by *Croesus at *Delphi, *Polycrates (1)'s famous ring, and ... More

tholos  

Richard Allan Tomlinson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
In classical architecture a tholos is a circular building. Examples include that on the west side of the Athenian Agora (otherwise referred to as the Skias, or parasol, from the shape of its roof; ... More

Thoricus  

John Ellis Jones

Thoricus, coastal *deme of SE *Attica, now a bare twin-peaked hill (Velatouri) north of modern Laurion. In legend, one of King *Cecrops' twelve Attic townships, home of the hunter king *Cephalus, and ... More

Timanthes, of Cythnus, painter, late 5th cent. BCE  

Thomas Bertram Lonsdale Webster and Karim Arafat

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Timanthes (late 5th cent. bce), painter, of Cythnus, or Sicyon. Famed for ingenium (‘imaginative ingenuity’). His ‘sacrifice of Iphigenia’ showed degrees of grief culminating in the veiled Agamemnon. ... More

Timotheus (3), Greek sculptor  

Gisela M. A. Richter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Timotheus (3), Greek sculptor, active during the first half and middle of the 4th cent. bce. He took part in two important monuments of which sculptural remains survive—the temple of ... More

tourism  

Antony Spawforth

Well-known Greek tourists include *Solon, said (Hdt. 1. 30) to have visited Egypt and Lydia ‘for the sake of seeing’ (theōria), and *Herodotus (1) himself. Sea-borne *trade and sightseeing were ... More

toys  

Frederick Norman Pryce and Michael Vickers

Specimens from children's tombs, and representations on Greek pottery vases provide our knowledge of ancient toys, which did not differ essentially from modern ones. For the infant there were ... More

transhumance  

Antony Spawforth

Transhumance, a form of semi-nomadism in which pastoralists move their flocks over long distances between summer and winter pastures. Well-attested in the Mediterranean more recently, it ... More

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