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Serapion (1), of Alexandria (1), Empiricist physician, fl. late 3rd cent. BCE?  

Heinrich von Staden

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Serapion (1) (or Sarapion) of *Alexandria (1) (fl. late-3rd cent. bce?), succeeded *Philinus of Cos as the leading Empiricist physician (see medicine, § 5.3). He claimed that experience is the sole ... More

Serapion (2), of Antioch (1), geographer, fl. 1st cent. BCE  

G. J. Toomer and Alexander Jones

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Serapion (2) of Antioch (1) wrote on geography (Cic. Att. 2. 6. 1), and said that the sun was 18 times the size of the earth. He has been erroneously identified with an astrologer Serapion of ... More

Serenus, of Antinoeia in Egypt, 4th cent. CE or later  

G. J. Toomer

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Serenus of Antinoeia in Egypt (4th cent. ce or later) wrote Section of a Cylinder and Section of a Cone, containing trivial propositions on conics. His commentary on the Conics of ... More

Serenus, Quintus, author  

William David Ross and V. Nutton

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Quintus Serenus (or Quinctius Serenius), author of a medical textbook in verse, Liber medicinalis, which may be dated between the end of the 2nd and 4th cents. It depends in the main on *Cornelius ... More

ships of Lake Nemi, the  

Deborah N. Carlson

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
The Lake Nemi ships were two enormous, palatial houseboats built by the Roman emperor Caligula (r. 37–41ce). Lake Nemi is a small volcanic crater lake just 1.8 km (1.1 miles) wide and 35 m ... More

siegecraft, Greek  

John F. Lazenby

The Greek national epics focused on the siege of a city, but it took ten years to capture *Troy, even if, in the end, the ‘wooden horse’ was some kind of sophisticated siege device. The inability to ... More

siegecraft, Roman  

Jonathan Coulston

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Early Roman besiegers employed blockade (obsidio) with methodical circumvallation, exploited surprise, and sometimes, especially after weakening the besiegers by obsidio, clinched matters by assault ... More

silver  

Frederick Norman Pryce, John Boardman, and Michael Vickers

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
While *gold could be easily obtained from alluvial deposits by washing, silver had to be extracted by regular mining processes. The *Phoenicians are said to have been the first to bring silver into ... More

Soranus, of Ephesus, physician  

Helen King

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Under *Trajan and *Hadrian (ce ... More

Sosigenes (1), astronomer, 47 BCE  

G. J. Toomer

Online publication date:
Mar 2016

Astronomer who advised Caesar in his reform of the Roman calendar (47 bce), and possibly composed the astronomical calendar associated with it. See calendar, roman.

Sosigenes (2), Peripatetic philosopher, 164 CE  

G. J. Toomer

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sosigenes (2), *Peripatetic philosopher, teacher of *Alexander (14) of Aphrodisias, is dated to 164 ce by his observation of an annular eclipse. He wrote, besides works on *logic and *optics, on ... More

Sostratus, leading surgeon and zoologist  

William David Ross

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Sostratus, leading surgeon and zoologist, probably practised in *Alexandria (1) after 30 bce. His medical works dealt chiefly with *gynaecology. In zoology (see animals, knowledge about) he perhaps ... More

statics  

Wilbur R. Knorr

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Statics (in the phrase of *Pappus), is the branch of *mechanics dealing with the relations of weights in static equilibrium. The classic formulation of the principles is from *Archimedes (Plane ... More

Statilius Crito (Κρίτων), Titus  

Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Statilius Crito (Κρίτων), Titus, of Carian Heraclea-Salbace, doctor (archiatros) to Trajan, who designated him an *amicus Augusti, took him on one of his Dacian campaigns, the basis for his Getic ... More

surgery  

Charles Joseph Singer and V. Nutton

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
bc In the Homeric poems (see homer) references to surgery are found mainly in the Iliad and concerned with the treatment of wounds. The wound is cleaned; blood squeezed or sucked out; edges united by ... More

technology  

Kevin Greene

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Modern definitions of technology focus upon the mechanical arts or applied sciences, while studies of invention and innovation range from industrial research and development laboratories to business ... More

Teucer (4), of Babylon, astrologer  

William David Ross

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Teucer (4) of Babylon (probably the Babylon in Egypt), astrologer, is conjectured to belong to the 1st cent. ce. He expounded the traditional astrology of Egypt and united with it oriental and Greek ... More

Theaetetus, of Athens, geometer, c. 415–369 BCE  

Wilbur R. Knorr and Reviel Netz

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Theaetetus (c. 415–369 bce) of Athens, geometer, initiated the special definitions and theory of irrational lines fundamental for book 10 of Euclid's Elements (cf. Eudemus, cited by Pappus, ed. ... More

Themison  

J. T. Vallance

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Themison of *Laodicea (probably Lycus), a pupil of *Asclepiades(3) of Bithynia, probably lived towards the end of the 1st cent. bce and spent at least part of his working life in Rome. ... More

Theodorus (2), of Cyrene, geometer, fl. late 5th cent. BCE  

Wilbur R. Knorr

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Theodorus (2) (fl. late 5th cent. bce) of *Cyrene, geometer, portrayed in *Plato(1)'s Theaetetus as a former disciple of *Protagoras, an associate of *Socrates, and a teacher of *Theaetetus. Plato ... More

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