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Aletes (1)  

Emily Kearns

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Son of *Aegisthus, killed by *Orestes in Mycenae (Hyg., Fab. 122, perhaps from the Attic tragedy Aletes, TrGF 3. 2. fr. 1b). His name (‘Wanderer’) may suggest an aetiological connection with the ... More

Aletrium  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aletrium (mod. Alatri), town of the *Hernici 70 km. (43 mi.) south-east of Rome. Always loyal to Rome after 358 bce, Aletrium became a prosperous *municipium (Cic. Clu.46) and remained such (reject ... More

Aleuadae  

Bruno Helly

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aleuadae, aristocratic family of *Larissa in *Thessaly. The military and political organization of the federal Thessalian state goes back to Aleuas the Red (second half of the 6th cent. bce). The ... More

Alexander (10) Balas  

Guy Thompson Griffith, Susan Mary Sherwin-White, and R. J. van der Spek

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Near East
Alexander (10) Balas, king of the Seleudid empire (150–145 bce), claiming to be the son of *Antiochus (4) IV, usurped the Seleucid throne after the defeat and death of *Demetrius (10) I near *Antioch ... More

Alexander (11) 'Polyhistor', Greek polymath and ethnographer  

Christopher Pelling

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Born c.105 bce at *Miletus, he was captured in the Mithradatic Wars (see mithradates vi) and came to Rome as a slave of an unidentifiable Cornelius Lentulus; he was freed and given Roman ... More

Alexander (12), Greek author, son of Numenius  

M. B. Trapp

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (12) (2nd cent. ce), son of *Numenius, wrote a Rhetoric (Τέχνη) and an influential treatise On Figures (Περὶ σχημάτων), which discussed the distinction between ‘natural’ and ... More

Alexander (13), of Abonuteichos  

David Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (13) of Abonuteichos in *Paphlagonia. He was a contemporary of *Lucian whose bitterly hostile account, Alexander or the False Prophet, remains the most important source of information, ... More

Alexander (14), of Aphrodisias, commentator on Aristotle  

Robert Sharples

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Philosophy
Appointed public teacher of Aristotelian philosophy, probably though not certainly in Athens, at some time between 198 and 209 ce (his treatise On Fate being dedicated then to *Septimius Severus and ... More

Alexander (15) Philalethes, 'Truth-lover', physician, fl. later 1st cent. BCE?  

Heinrich von Staden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (15) Philalethes (‘Truth-lover’), a physician (fl. later 1st cent. bce?), succeeded *Zeuxis (3) as leader of the Asian branch of *Herophilus's ‘school’. Alexander's views on digestion, on ... More

Alexander (16), of Tralles, physician, 525–605 CE  

John Scarborough

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (16), of Tralles, physician, 525–605 ce, died in Rome. The author of an extant encyclopaedia of practical medicine, Alexander shows his continual adaptation of Graeco-Roman texts in light ... More

Alexander (1) I, 'the Philhellene', king of Macedon, c. 498–454 BCE  

Albert Brian Bosworth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (1) I, ‘the Philhellene’, king of Macedon c.498–454 bce. Subject to Persia from 492 and related by marriage to the Persian noble Bubares, he used his influence to extend his territory ... More

Alexander (2) II, king of Macedon, 370–368 BCE  

Albert Brian Bosworth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (2) II, eldest son of *Amyntas (1) III and Eurydice, and king of Macedon 370–368 bce. His short and turbulent reign was bedevilled by rivalry and open war with his brother-in-law, Ptolemy ... More

Alexander III(3), 'the Great', of Macedon, 356–323 BCE  

Albert Brian Bosworth

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Son of *Philip (1) II and *Olympias. As crown prince he was taught by *Aristotle (from 342); he was his father's deputy in Macedon (340) and fought with distinction at the battle of *Chaeronea (338). ... More

Alexander (4) IV, 323–310? BCE  

Albert Brian Bosworth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (4) IV (323–?310 bce), posthumous son of *Alexander (3) the Great and *Roxane. Already designated to the kingship at Babylon, he was elevated by *Perdiccas (3) (322) to join ... More

Alexander (5), of Pherae, tyrant, 369–358 BCE  

Albert Brian Bosworth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
He achieved power by the murder of his uncle, Polyphron, and throughout his reign he attempted to restore the dominant position in *Thessaly which *Jason (2) had won for *Pherae, struggling against ... More

Alexander (6) I, king of Molossia, 342–330/329 BCE  

Albert Brian Bosworth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (6) I, king of Molossia in *Epirus (342–330/29 bce). Brother of *Olympias, he grew up at the court of *Philip (1) II and was placed on the Molossian throne by force in 342. Ties ... More

Alexander (7) II, king of Molossia, 272–c. 240 BCE  

Albert Brian Bosworth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (7) II, son of *Pyrrhus and king of Molossia 272–c.240 bce. During the Chremonidean War (see chremonides) he invaded Macedonia (c.262/1) but was routed and deposed by *Antigonus (2) ... More

Alexander (8), of Pleuron, 'the Aetolian'  

Ken Dowden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (8) of Pleuron, ‘the Aetolian’ (he is the only known Aetolian poet), *grammaticus and poet, born c.315 bce, contemporary with *Callimachus (3) and *Theocritus. Around 285–283, he undertook ... More

Alexander (9), viceroy of Corinth and Euboea, c. 290–c. 245 BCE  

Albert Brian Bosworth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexander (9) (c. 290–c. 245 bce), son of *Craterus (2) and his successor as viceroy of *Corinth and *Euboea, declared himself independent in 249 (rather than 252) and allied himself with the ... More

Alexander Romance  

Richard Stoneman

Online publication date:
Feb 2018
The Alexander Romance is a fictionalized life of Alexander III of Macedon (Alexander the Great, 356–323 bce), originating in the 3rd century BC, though the earliest evidence for its ... More

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