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Ammianus Marcellinus, c. 330–395 CE  

John F. Matthews

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Ammianus Marcellinus (c. 330–95 ce), the last great Latin historian of the Roman empire, was born at Syrian *Antioch (1). His early entry, c.350, into the élite corps of protectores domestici may ... More

Ammon  

Alan H. Griffiths

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Ammon (Ἄμμων), *Hellenized name of Amun, the great god of Egyptian *Thebes (2) and chief divinity of the developed Egyptian pantheon; thus naturally identified with *Zeus (so first in Pindar, who ... More

Ammonius (1)  

John Francis Lockwood and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Ammonius (1), pupil and successor of *Aristarchus (2) (schol. Il. 10. 397; Suda, entry under the name), wrote besides a commentary on Homer (POxy. 2. 121), other works on the Homeric ... More

Ammonius (2) Saccas  

Erik Robertson Dodds and John Dillon

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Ammonius (2) Saccas, of *Alexandria (1), Platonist philosopher, active in first half of 3rd cent. ce, famous as the teacher of *Plotinus, who studied under him 232–42, as well as of *Origen (1) the ... More

amnesty  

Stephen Todd

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
To propose or demand the recall of *exiles was common throughout the Greek world, and attempts by such exiles to recover confiscated property frequently provoked further strife (e.g. Xen. Hell. 5. 3. ... More

amoebean verse  

Edward Courtney

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amoebean verse, a stylistic form found mainly in bucolic poetry (adapted in Catull. 62, Hor. Carm. 3. 9), consists of matching groups of verse assigned alternately to two characters ... More

Amorgos  

R. W. V. Catling

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Amorgos, a narrow mountainous island (124 sq. km.: 48 sq. mi) in the SE *Cyclades. Its location makes it an attractive staging-point for shipping. Having flourished in the early bronze age, its later ... More

Ampelius, Lucius  

Leofranc Holford-Strevens

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Ampelius, Lucius, dedicated his 50-chapter Liber memorialis to a Macrinus still sometimes identified with the emperor M. *Opellius Macrinus, but language and intellectual level are those ... More

Amphiaraus  

Hanne Eisenfeld

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Seer and warrior, member of royal family of Argos, descended from Melampus. Son of Oecles, husband of Eriphyle, father of Alcmaeon (1) and Amphilochus. Unwilling participant in the expedition of the ... More

amphictiony  

Jakob Aall Ottesen Larsen and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Amphictiony (from amphiktiones, ‘dwellers around’) is the name given to Greek leagues connected with *sanctuaries and the maintenance of their cults. Most were concentrated in the locality of the ... More

Amphilochi  

Nicholas Geoffrey Lemprière Hammond

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Amphilochi, a tribe of NW Greece, occupying the wooded hill-country east of the gulf of Ambracia and controlling the narrow passage above the coast from *Acarnania and *Aetolia to *Ambracia. The only ... More

Amphilochus  

Herbert Jennings Rose

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amphilochus, in mythology, brother of *Alcmaeon (1), and, in some accounts (as Apollod. 3. 82 and 86), his comrade in the expedition of the *Epigoni and helper in slaying Eriphyle. After ... More

Amphion and Zethus  

A. Schachter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amphion and Zethus, sons of *Zeus and *Antiope: they founded and walled seven-gated *Thebes (1) (Od. 11. 260–5). The story is fleshed out by Sophocles (Niobe) and Euripides ... More

Amphipolis  

James Maxwell Ross Cormack and Nicholas Geoffrey Lemprière Hammond

Amphipolis, on the east bank of the Strymon, which surrounds the city on three sides (hence its name), 5 km. (3 mi.) from its seaport Eïon; it was originally the site of a Thracian town, Ennea Hodoi ... More

Amphis  

Geoffrey Arnott

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amphis, Middle *comedy poet. His 28 titles come chiefly from mythology or daily life, but Gynaecocratia (‘Government by Women’) sounds like an Aristophanic theme, and Dithyrambus (‘*dithyramb’) may ... More

Amphissa  

W. M. Murray

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amphissa, ‘the largest and most famous city of the [western, Ozolian] Locrians’ (Paus. 10. 38. 2; see locris). Its traditional policy being enmity with *Phocis and alliance with *Thebes ... More

amphitheatres  

Ian Archibald Richmond and Janet DeLaine

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The earliest surviving permanent amphitheatres are found in *Campania, the well-preserved example at *Pompeii, called spectacula by its builders (CIL 10. 852), being the only closely datable example ... More

Amphitryon  

A. Schachter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amphitryon, son of Alcaeus king of Tiryns. He and his fiancée *Alcmene (daughter of Electryon king of *Mycenae) were forced to flee to *Thebes (1) after he had accidentally killed ... More

amphorae and amphora stamps, Greek  

Alan Johnston and Virginia Randolph Grace

The amphora is one of the most versatile and long-lived pot shapes. A two-handled jar (amphi-phoreus, ‘carried on both sides’), it can vary enormously in size, detail of shape, and manner ... More

amphorae and amphora stamps, Roman  

David J. Mattingly

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amphorae, ceramic coarseware jars used for transporting a range of goods, provide the most abundant and meaningful archaeological data on the nature, range, and scale of Roman inter-regional trade in ... More

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