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Antiochus (13) Chuzon  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Antiochus (13) Chuzon, chief architect of the *Theodosian Code of ce 438, was a lawyer from Antioch (1). He was quaestor to *Theodosius (3) II from March 427 to April 430, praetorian prefect in ... More

Antistius Labeo, Marcus  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Antistius Labeo, Marcus, whose family came from *Samnium, was a leading Roman lawyer of the age of *Augustus and died between ce 10 and 22. His father Pacuvius, also a lawyer, was killed fighting for ... More

apparitores  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Apparitores, salaried officials who attended Roman magistrates and priests, attested from the 4th cent. bce to the 3rd cent. ce. They constituted one of the few resources of executive agency and ... More

Arcadius Charisius, Aurelius  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Aurelius Arcadius Charisius, a Roman lawyer and *magister libellorum (master of petitions) of the age of *Diocletian, was assigned by some earlier scholars to the time of *Constantine or later, ... More

Ateius Capito (2), Gaius, Roman consul, 5 CE  

Thomas Little Heath

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Ateius Capito (2), Gaius, a lawyer of modest senatorial family, was a follower of Ofilius, became consul in 5 ce and was supervisor of the water supply (curator aquarum, see cura(tio)) ... More

betrothal, Roman sponsalia  

Gordon Willis Williams and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
In the republic consisted of reciprocal sponsiones, and breach-of-promise actions (in the form of actions for damages) existed. The movement of classical Roman law was in the direction of ... More

brigandage  

Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Brigandage (Gk. lesteia, Lat. latrocinium), the unlawful use of personal violence to maraud by land, was not condemned wholesale by the Classical Greeks. A carry-over from pre-state times, it ... More

Callistratus (4), Roman lawyer, late 2nd cent. CE  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
A provincial Roman lawyer of the reign of *Septimius Severus (193–211 ce) whose name points to a Greek background. Besides dealing with the provincial governor's edict (Edictum ... More

candidatus  

Piero Treves, Eastland Stuart Staveley, and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
A candidate for a Roman magistracy. Officially named petitor (his rivals were therefore styled competitores), he was called candidatus because he wore a whitened toga when greeting electors in the ... More

Cassius Longinus (2), Gaius, Roman lawyer, mid-1st cent. CE  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Gaius Cassius Longinus (2), a great-grandson (or nephew) of the tyrannicide *Cassius of the same name, and descended on his mother's side from Servius *Sulpicius Rufus, was a senator of ... More

censor  

Peter Sidney Derow

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
The title of one of a pair of senior Roman magistrates, elected by the centuriate assembly (see centuria) to hold office for eighteen months. Although they lacked *imperium and the right to an escort ... More

census  

Peter Sidney Derow

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
A national register prepared at Rome, on the basis of which were determined voting rights and liability for military service and taxation. The census was held first by the king, then by the *consuls, ... More

centumviri  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Centumviri, (lit. 100 men), a special civil court at Rome, or, strictly, the panel from which a court (consilium) was chosen. The panel numbered in fact in the later republic 105 men (three taken ... More

Cervidius Scaevola, Quintus  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Quintus Cervidius Scaevola, a leading Roman lawyer of the later 2nd cent. ce, probably came from *Carthage and, through his wife, had a close connection with Nemausus (Nîmes). Perhaps a pupil of ... More

children in Roman law  

Ville Vuolanto

Online publication date:
Feb 2018
Subject:
Roman Law
In the Roman world, the age limits connected to children were often flexible. Even in the case of legal liability, the ages were not rigid. In individual cases, children’s capacity to understand ... More

citizenship, Roman  

Michael Crawford

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
In both the Greek and the Roman world in the Archaic period, it seems that communities were open to the arrival of people from elsewhere, at all social levels, whether one thinks of Hesiod's father, ... More

civitas  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Civitas, ‘citizenship, citizen community’ (for the first, see citizenship, roman), term of Roman administrative law referring, like Greek *polis, to any free-standing community, and specifically, in ... More

classis  

Tim Cornell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
A classis (‘class’) was a group of Roman citizens who could meet a certain minimum wealth qualification. Servius *Tullius is supposed to have divided property owners into five classes for military ... More

cliens  

Arnaldo Momigliano and Tim Cornell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
In Rome a client was a free man who entrusted himself to another and received protection in return. Clientship was a hereditary social status consecrated by usage and recognized, though not defined ... More

client kings  

David C. Braund

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The term ‘client kings’ is conventionally used by scholars to denote a range of monarchs and quasi-monarchs of non-Roman peoples who enjoyed a relationship with Rome that was essentially harmonious ... More

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