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Timocles, Middle Comedy poet  

Kenneth Dover

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Timocles Middle Comedy poet, (see comedy (greek), middle) late in the period but much given to personal satire in the manner of earlier comedy; almost half the extant citations refer to individuals ... More

Timocreon, lyric and elegiac poet, late 6th/early 5th cent. BCE  

C. Carey

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Timocreon (late 6th/early 5th cent. BCE), lyric and elegiac poet, of *Ialysus on *Rhodes. He was sufficiently famous for *Aristophanes (1) to parody (Ach. 533 f.; Vesp. 1060 f.), but was remembered ... More

Timon (1), of Athens, semilegendary misanthrope  

Victor Ehrenberg

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Timon of Athens, the famous misanthrope, a semi-legendary character. He seems to have lived in the time of *Pericles(1). *Aristophanes(1) is the first to allude to him. He became known to ... More

Timostratus  

Geoffrey Arnott

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Timostratus, one of the latest comic poets in Athens whose fragments survive. A man of good Athenian family, he came fifth with Λυτ[ρούμενος] (‘Man Ransoming’ or ‘Being Ransomed’) in 188 bce, and ... More

Timotheus (1), of Miletus, citharode and dithyrambic poet, c. 450–360 BCE  

Bernhard Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Timotheus (1) (c. 450–360 bce), of Miletus, famous citharode (lyre player and singer) and dithyrambic poet (see dithyramb). *Pherecrates criticizes him as the most effective musical innovator of the ... More

Tisias, of Syracuse, teacher of rhetoric, 5th cent. BCE  

Donald Russell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tisias of Syracus (5th cent. bce), teacher of rhetoric, pupil of *Corax. *Plato(1) (Phdr. 267a ff.) is the earliest evidence for Tisias' having taught the importance of probability (εἰκός) ... More

tourism  

Antony Spawforth

Well-known Greek tourists include *Solon, said (Hdt. 1. 30) to have visited Egypt and Lydia ‘for the sake of seeing’ (theōria), and *Herodotus (1) himself. Sea-borne *trade and sightseeing were ... More

Toxaris  

Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Toxaris, one of the two speakers in Lucian's fictional essay of the same name, representing him as a Scythian visitor to Athens, given heroic honours there after his death in gratitude for ... More

tragedy, Greek  

Richard Seaford, Patricia E. Easterling, and Fiona Macintosh

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tragedy, one of the most influential literary forms that originated in Greece, is particularly associated with Athens in the 5th cent. bce, the period that saw its most distinctive ... More

tragic history  

Lisa Irene Hau

Online publication date:
May 2018
Tragic history is a phrase coined in the late 19th century to describe a certain type of Hellenistic history writing, which was thought to have Peripatetic underpinnings, and ... More

Triclinius, Demetrius, early 14th cent. CE  

Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Demetrius Triclinius (early 14th cent.), one of the most important scholars of his day, lived probably Thessalonica. He prepared editions of numerous classical poets, using his knowledge ... More

Triphiodorus, of Panopolis  

Laura Miguélez-Cavero

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Triphiodorus, who originated from Egypt and lived in the 3rd century ce, was an epic poet and teacher of grammar whose only extant work is The Sack of Troy (691 lines, narrating the final events of ... More

Troy  

Carl W. Blegen and D. F. Easton

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Troy lies in north-west *Asia Minor 5 km. from the *Hellespont. The site consists of a mound with c. 25 m. of deposits and a 1 km. sq. skirt to the south. It was noted by F. Kauffer (1793), ... More

Tryphon (2), Greek grammarian, late 1st cent. BCE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tryphon (2), son of Ammonius, an important Greek grammarian from *Alexandria(1) (late 1st cent. bce). His works, which were used by his contemporary *Didymus(1), by *Apollonius(13) ... More

Tynnichus, of Chalcis, early 5th cent. BCE?  

Bernhard Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tynnichus (early 5th cent.?), poet of *Chalcis, whose reputation rested on a *Paean, of which one line was admired by *Aeschylus (test. 114 Radt = Porphyrius 2. 18, p. 148 Nauck) and by ... More

Tyrannio (1), 'the Elder', Aristarchan teacher at Rome, early 1st cent. BCE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes, Robert Browning, and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Theophrastus, son of Epicratides, of *Amisus (where his teacher nicknamed him Tyrannio), afterwards a pupil of *Dionysius (15) Thrax, was brought by L. *Licinius Lucullus (2) as prisoner to Rome, ... More

Tyrannio (2) , 'the Younger', grammarian, 1st cent. BCE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Tyrannio (2) the Younger, son of Artemidorus, a *Phoenician, originally named Diocles, was brought as a prisoner to Rome and freed by *Terentia, the widow of *Cicero. He was a pupil of ... More

Tyro  

Richard Hunter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tyro, in mythology, daughter of *Salmoneus and mother (by Cretheus) of *Jason(1)'s father Aeson and (by *Poseidon) of the twins *Pelias and *Neleus. Tyro loved the river *Enipeus, but Poseidon ... More

Tyrtaeus  

Martin Litchfield West

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tyrtaeus, Spartan elegiac poet of the mid-7th cent. bce. His works are said to have filled five books; some 250 lines or parts of lines survive in quotations and papyri. They are of great historical ... More

Tzetzes, Johannes, 12th cent. CE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes, Robert Browning, and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Johannes Tzetzes (12th cent. ce), a copious, careless, quarrelsome Byzantine polymath. In his youth he wrote (ce 1143) a commentary on *Homer's Iliad of which the greater part is still unpublished, ... More

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