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Anactorium  

Nicholas Geoffrey Lemprière Hammond

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Anactorium, a joint colony of Corinthians and Acarnanians (see corinth; acarnania) was founded c.620 bce on the south coast of the gulf of *Ambracia. It sent troops to fight in the battle of *Plataea ... More

Anagnia  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Anagnia (mod. Anagni), chief town of the *Hernici (Aen. 7. 684), in the fertile Sacco valley, with well-preserved walls. In 306 bce Anagnia became a civitas sine suffragio (see ... More

Ancona  

Max Cary and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Ancona, an important Picene town (see picenum), occupied from at least as early as the 9th cent. bce, and with the only good harbour on the central east coast of Italy. The colony was founded in 387 ... More

Andros  

R. W. V. Catling

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Andros, the most northerly and (after *Naxos (1)) second largest (380 sq. km; 147 sq. mi.) of the *Cyclades, its windswept, mountainous landscape mitigated by sheltered, fertile valleys. Gaureion in ... More

Anio  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Anio (mod. Aniene), a river of Italy rising in the Sabine country (see sabini) and separating it from *Latium (Plin. HN 3. 54). After flowing 120 km. (75 mi.) west-south-west it joins the *Tiber at ... More

Anthedon  

John Buckler

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Anthedon, harbour town on the NE coast of *Boeotia, known for the legend of *Glaucus (4) the fisherman. The remains of circuit-walls and harbour installations can still be seen. Generally a part of ... More

Antichthon/Antipodes  

Alfred Hiatt

The terms antipodes and antichthones, along with others such as antoikoi and perioikoi, referred to hypothetical peoples dwelling beyond the extent of the known world. These terms were the product of ... More

Anticyra  

W. M. Murray

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Anticyra, an excellent Phocian port in the gulf east of *Cirrha, known for the hellebore (a medicinal plant) that grew nearby. Identified by Pausanias (10. 36. 5–10) with Homeric Cyparissus, it ... More

Antinoöpolis  

Walter Eric Harold Cockle

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
A nome capital (see nomos (1)) of Middle Egypt east of the Nile, founded in ce 130 by Hadrian in memory of *Antinous (2) on a necropolis containing a temple of Rameses II. The via Hadriana ... More

Antissa  

D. Graham J. Shipley

Antissa, small coastal *polis in NW *Lesbos; birthplace of the poet *Terpander. A bronze age site has been explored; the Classical town originated in the early geometric period. Three ... More

Antium  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Antium (mod. Anzio), in *Latium. It was occupied from at least the 8th cent. bce by people with a material culture resembling that of Rome itself. It was certainly Latin in the 6th cent. bce (Dion. ... More

Apamea  

Arnold Hugh Martin Jones and Susan Mary Sherwin-White

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Apamea, a city on the *Orontes, *Syria, which replaced the Macedonian military colony of Pella. It was founded by Seleucus I (or perhaps Antiochus I). It was the military headquarters of Seleucid ... More

Apennines  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Apennines, Italy's limestone mountain backbone, branch off from the Alps near Genoa (*Genua). At first they are of moderate height (900–1,200 m.; 3,000–4,000 ft.), and run eastwards forming the ... More

Aphrodisias  

Joyce Reynolds

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aphrodisias (mod. Geyre), was a *Carian city, probably established in the 2nd cent. bce as the political centre of ‘the Plarasans and Aphrodisians’ (Plarasans dropped from the description under ... More

Apollonia  

Max Cary and Nicholas Geoffrey Lemprière Hammond

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Apollonia, the name of several Greek cities (IACP nos.13, 77, 545, 627, 682). The chief of these was in Illyria (IACP no. 77), founded c.600 bce where the river Aous enters the coastal plain, with ... More

Apulia  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Apulia (mod. Puglia), a region of SE Italy corresponding to Augustan *Regio II, bounded by the valleys of the Bradano and Tiferno. Regio II also included a part of *Samnium which was not Apulian in ... More

Aquileia  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aquileia, a city a few kilometres from the head of the Adriatic. In 186 bce Transalpine Gauls occupied this fertile site, which controls roads across the Julian Alps. Rome ejected them and ... More

Aquincum  

Franz A. W. Schehl and John Wilkes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aquincum, on the Danube at Budapest, was the centre of the Illyrian-Celtic Eravisci, whose settlement lay on the Gellért hill, later the provincial capital of Lower Pannonia. Throughout the Roman ... More

Aquitania  

John Frederick Drinkwater

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
A name originally applied to the area bounded by the Garonne, the Pyrenees, and the bay of Biscay. The Aquitani are described as differing from the other Gauls in speech, customs, and physique, and ... More

Arae Flaviae  

John Frederick Drinkwater

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Arae Flaviae (mod. Rottweil), on the Neckar. In ce 74 the Roman Rhine–Danube frontier was shortened by carrying a road south-eastwards from Strasburg (*Argentorate) to the *Danube. A fort was built ... More

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