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Cephisodotus (2), Athenian sculptor, fl. 344–293 BCE  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Cephisodotus (2), Athenian sculptor, son of *Praxiteles. Active between 344 and 293 bce. With his younger brother Timarchus, Cephisodotus inherited his father's workshop, his clientele, ... More

Ceramicus  

Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Ceramicus, Kerameikos, large and (in ancient authors) loosely defined district of NW Athens based on the potters’ (kerameis) quarter. Within the Themistoclean wall it embraced the area from the ... More

Chares (4), of Lindus, Greek sculptor, fl. 300 ?BCE  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Chares (4), of *Lindus, Greek sculptor, active c.300 bce. A follower of *Lysippus (2), Chares was renowned for his bronze statue of *Helios for *Rhodes, the famous Colossus. Some 32 m. (105 ft.) ... More

Cnossus, Greek and Roman  

Lucia F. Nixon and Simon Price

A town on Crete. It flourished from the 9th to the 6th cent., to judge from the evidence of large numbers of tombs (protogeometric to orientalizing periods), but seems to have lost power in the ... More

colonization, Greek  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
‘Colonization’, in the language of a former imperial power, is a somewhat misleading definition of the process of major Greek expansion that took place between c.734 and 580 bce. In fact, ... More

court  

Antony Spawforth

Court, in mediaeval and early-modern times the ruler's household and retinue, its spatial and institutional setting, and, by extension, the ruling power as constituted by monarch and helpers in ... More

Cresilas, Greek sculptor, active c. 440–410 BCE  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
His statues of *Pericles (1) and Dieitrephes shot through with arrows (Plin.HN 34. 74; Paus. 1. 23. 3, 25. 1) stood on the Acropolis; their signed bases survive, plus a dedication to ... More

Critius  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Critius, Athenian (?) sculptor, active c.490–460 bce. Author, with Nesiotes, of six dedications on the Acropolis, all bronzes. The two were famed for their bronze Tyrannicides (Harmodius ... More

crowns and wreaths, Greek  

Brian Campbell

Online publication date:
Jul 2016
Crowns and wreaths (στέφανος, στεφάνη) were worn by Greeks for a variety of ceremonial purposes: by priests when *sacrificing, by members of dramatic choruses, orators and symposiasts (see ... More

Cypselus, chest of  

Stanley Casson, Gisela M. A. Richter, and Michael Vickers

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
A chest of cedar-wood decorated with figures in ivory, gold, and wood, exhibited at *Olympia in the temple of Hera. It is said to have been the one in which the infant *Cypselus was hidden, and ... More

Damophon, Messenian sculptor  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Messenian sculptor, active early 2nd cent. bce. Repaired Phidias' *Zeus at *Olympia and made marble cult statues for cities of the *Achaean Confederacy: Messene, Aegium, *Megalopolis, and ... More

dead, disposal of  

Ian Morris

Correct disposal of the dead was always a crucial element in easing the *soul of the deceased into the next world. However, the forms of burial varied enormously. Great significance was attached to ... More

Delion  

John F. Lazenby

Temple of *Apollo on the NE coast of *Boeotia (now Dhilesi), where the Boeotians defeated the Athenians in 424 bce. The Athenians, with 7,000 *hoplites and some cavalry, but no proper ... More

Delphi  

Catherine A. Morgan, Simon Hornblower, and Antony Spawforth

(See also Delphic oracle; Pythian Games). Delphi, one of the four great *panhellenic*sanctuaries (the others are *Isthmia, *Olympia, *Nemea), is on the lower southern slopes of *Parnassus, c.610 m. ... More

Demetrius (2), of Alopece, Athenian sculptor  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Demetrius (2) of Alopece, Athenian sculptor, active c.400–370 bce. Maker of portrait-bronzes renowned for their realism (Quint.Institutio oratoria 12. 10. 9, etc. ). His subjects included the aged ... More

dēmiourgoi  

Frank William Walbank and P. J. Rhodes

Dēmiourgoi, ‘public workers’, are in *Homer such independent craftsmen as metalworkers, potters, and masons, and also seers, doctors, bards, and heralds. *Plato (1) and *Xenophon (1) use the word ... More

diadem  

Ludwig Alfred Moritz and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Diadem (διάδημα), royal headband, with sceptre and purple an attribute of Hellenistic kingship; a flat strip of white cloth, knotted behind, with the ends left free-hanging. It originated with ... More

dicing  

Ludwig Alfred Moritz

Dicing with six-sided dice (κύβοι, tesserae) or four-sided knucklebones (ἀστράγαλοι, tali; natural or manufactured from e.g. ivory) was a popular amusement in both Greece and Rome, either ... More

diekplous  

Philip de Souza

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Diekplous (διέκπλους), a Greek naval term meaning ‘a sailing through and out’, is used by ancient authors to describe a common manœuvre in which individual ships, sailing together in line abreast, ... More

diolkos  

John Salmon

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Stone trackway across the isthmus of *Corinth for transporting ships and/or cargoes between the Saronic and the Corinthian gulfs. Archaeology suggests a date under *Periander; there is literary ... More

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