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conventus  

Graham Burton

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Conventus, ‘assembly’, is technically used(1) for associations of Italians abroad;(2) for provincial assizes.(1) By the early 2nd cent. bce Italians (especially in the east) united for religious and ... More

corrector  

Graham Burton

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
In the eastern provinces correctores of the *free cities of a province, which were technically independent of the provincial governor, are first attested under *Trajan. He sent a praetorian senator ... More

Coruncanius, Tiberius  

Peter Sidney Derow

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tiberius Coruncanius, from *Tusculum, consul 280 bce, dictator (for elections) 246, died 243. As consul he celebrated a triumph over *Volsinii and *Vulci and was active with his colleague (P. ... More

courts, Roman  

Leanne Bablitz

Online publication date:
Jun 2018
Subject:
Roman Law
Because the modern legal system used in most western countries derives from ancient Rome, it is easy to assume that Roman courts (and the activities that took place before them) were the ... More

criminal law, Roman  

Andrew M. Riggsby

Online publication date:
Jul 2017
Subject:
Roman Law
“Crime” lacks a fully agreed definition across modern societies, but competing versions tend to stress notions like punishment, protection of public or collective interests, and a ... More

crucifixion  

George Ronald Watson and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Crucifixion seems to have been a form of punishment borrowed by the Romans from elsewhere, probably *Carthage. As a Roman penalty it is first certainly attested in the *Punic Wars. It was normally ... More

cura(tio), curator  

Ernst Badian

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
In Roman public law, cura(tio) means the responsibility for a particular area of public administration, normally inhering in a magistrate. *Cicero, in his description of the ideal (Roman) ... More

curator rei publicae  

Graham Burton

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Curator rei publicae (or civitatis, etc. ), in Greek λογιστής, was an official of the central government; the first certain example occurs under *Domitian (ILS 1017). Curatores normally were ... More

cursus honorum  

T. Corey Brennan

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Down to the 3rd cent. bce there were perhaps few rules concerning the cursus honorum (career path) other than a requisite period of military service before seeking the political offices open to one's ... More

Cyrene, edicts of  

Arnaldo Momigliano and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Five edicts of *Augustus preserved in a Greek inscription from *Cyrene, published in 1927. The first four belong to 7–6 bce and apply to the public province of *Crete and Cyrene alone; the fifth, ... More

damnum iniuria datum  

R. Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Damnum iniuria datum was one of the four sources of delictual obligations mentioned in Gaius, Institutio oratoria 3. 182. It was based on the most important statutory enactment on Roman private law ... More

decaproti  

Arnold Hugh Martin Jones and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Decaproti (δεκάπρωτοι) first appear in 66 ce and become common throughout the eastern provinces of the Roman empire in the 2nd and early 3rd cents.; the office was abolished in Egypt and ... More

decemprimi  

A. N. Sherwin-White

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Decemprimi, the ten senior members of the local council of a Latin or Roman municipality (*municipium), formed with the yearly magistrates a group which in times of crisis represented the community ... More

Decemvirates, First and Second  

Andrew Drummond

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
According to the developed Roman tradition, after prolonged plebeian agitation for the compilation of a law code, all regular magistracies (including the plebeian tribunate) were suspended for 451 ... More

decemviri stlitibus iudicandis  

Andrew Drummond

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Decemviri stlitibus iudicandis ('Board of ten for judging lawsuits'). Sextus Pomponius (Dig. 1. 2. 2. 29) implies that this minor magistracy (belonging to the *vigintisexviri) was established soon ... More

decuriones  

A. N. Sherwin-White, Arnold Hugh Martin Jones, and Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Decuriones were the councillors who ran Roman local government in both colonies and municipalities (see municipium), Latin and Roman. They did so as members of the local council (senatus, ... More

dediticii  

Michael Crawford

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Originally, persons who have made a deditio in fidem, an unconditional surrender, to Rome; the normal consequence in the case of a whole community was that Rome regulated their status, ... More

delict  

Maria Floriana Cursi

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
“Delict” (delictum) is, in Roman law, a private wrong, as opposed to a public wrong called “crime” (crimen). Notwithstanding its private nature, in the beginning the consequence of a delict was a ... More

destinatio  

Eastland Stuart Staveley and Barbara Levick

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
An electoral term derived from the verb destinare. The use of the verb in Livy 39. 32. 9 shows that the ‘marking out’ or ‘fixing on’ a candidate at any stage of the electoral process did not ... More

detestatio sacrorum  

Andrew Dominic Edwards Lewis

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Renunciation of family rites. A Roman head of household (sui iuris) performed religious rites (sacra). These rites were peculiar to each family group. If such a person agreed to be transferred by ... More

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