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Artemidorus (1), of Tarsus, Greek grammarian, 2nd–1st cent. BCE  

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

Artemidorus (1), of Tarsus (2nd and 1st cents. bce), grammarian. For his edition of the bucolic poets he wrote Anth. Pal. 9. 205. See also glossa, glossary, greek.

Artemidorus (2), fl. 104–101 BCE  

Eric Herbert Warmington and Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Artemidorus (2) (fl. 104–101 BCE), a Greek of *Ephesus; his name means ‘gift of *Artemis', the city’s most important goddess. He voyaged along Mediterranean shores, outer Spain (and Gaul?), and in ... More

Artemon (1), editor of letters of Aristotle  

M. B. Trapp

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Artemon (1) (probably not later than 2nd cent. bce), sometimes identified with *Artemon (2) of Cassandreia or *Artemon (3) of Pergamum, edited the letters of Aristotle with notes on the ... More

Artemon (2), of Cassandreia, Greek author  

M. B. Trapp

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Artemon (2), of Cassandreia (perhaps 2nd or 1st cent. bce), wrote two bibliographical treatises (perhaps part of a single work): (1)On Collecting Books,(2)On Using Books, in the second book of which ... More

Artemon (5), of Magnesia, Greek author  

M. B. Trapp

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

Artemon (5), of Magnesia (date uncertain), author of a Famous Exploits of Women, from which *Sopater (2) made excerpts.

Asclepiades (1), of Tragilus, Greek author of the Tragodumena, 4th cent. BCE  

Ken Dowden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Asclepiades of Tragilus (4th cent. bce), wrote the Tragodumena (FGrH12). This learned six-book work focused on how tragedy told myth in comparison with other accounts, such as those of earlier ... More

Asclepiades (2), Sicelides, of Samos, Greek poet, fl. 300–270 BCE  

Alan Douglas Edward Cameron

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Asclepiades (2), of Samos, also called Sicelides (fl. 300–270 bce). Inventor of the Alexandrian erotic *epigram (see alexandria (1); museum), distinguished by concise and witty treatment ... More

Asclepiades (4), of Myrleia in Bithynia, Greek author, 1st cent. BCE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes and Kenneth S. Sacks

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Asclepiades (4), of Myrleia in *Bithynia (1st cent. bce), worked in Spain, and wrote on the history of Bithynia, and of scholarship; on *Homer and *Theocritus; and, as Atticist analogist, Περὶ ... More

Asclepiodotus  

Brian Campbell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Asclepiodotus, probably the pupil of *Posidonius (2), wrote an account of the Greek *phalanx and other branches of the army, which after *Aeneas Tacticus is the earliest extant example of a treatise ... More

Asianism and Atticism  

M. Winterbottom

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The Greek orators of Asia Minor during the Hellenistic period developed a new style of oratory, marked by wordplay, emotional effect, bombast, and rhythm; some idea of it can be obtained from the ... More

Asius  

Martin Litchfield West

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

Asius, of Samos (?6th cent. bce), wrote genealogical hexameter poetry (see genealogy) concerning the legendary history of *Samos and other parts of Greece; also some elegy.

assonance, Greek  

Michael Silk

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Assonance is a technical term of modern literary analysis, used of a perceptible repetition of a sound or sounds within a verbal sequence. We may distinguish: (1) consonantal repetition, generally ... More

Astydamas  

Andrew Brown

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Astydamas, the name of two tragic poets of the 4th cent. bce, father and son. The father was the son of Morsimus, son of *Aeschylus' nephew Philocles. It appears that some of the information attached ... More

Athenaeus (1), of Naucratis, author of Δειπνοσοφισταί, fl. c. 200 CE  

Walter Manoel Edwards, Robert Browning, and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Athenaeus (1) (fl. c. 200 ce), of *Naucratis in Egypt. His only extant work, Δειπνοσοφισταί (‘The Learned Banquet’), was probably completed in the years immediately following the death of *Commodus ... More

Autocrates  

Kenneth Dover

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Autocrates, Athenian comic poet, ἀρχαῖος (‘Old’; see comedy (greek), old), according to the Suda, which adds ‘he wrote also many tragedies’. Τυμπανισταί (or Τυμπανίστριαι, Hsch.) is the ... More

Axionicus  

Geoffrey Arnott

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Axionicus, Middle Comedy poet (see comedy (greek), middle), perhaps late in the period (fr. 2 mentions Gryllis, a *parasite of one of *Alexander (3) the Great's generals). Fr. 4 parodies a ... More

Babrius, Valerius (?)  

Neil Hopkinson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Valerius Babrius (?), probably from Syria or Asia Minor, composed not later than the 2nd cent. ce (Oxyrhynchus Papyri 1249) Μυθίαμβοι Αἰσώπειοι, ‘Fables of *Aesop in Iambics’, being ... More

Bacchylides, lyric poet, c. 520–450 BCE  

H. Maehler

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Bacchylides (c. 520–450 BCE), lyric poet, of Iulis in *Ceos, son of Midon (or Midylus, Etym. Magn. 582, 20), nephew of *Simonides (Strabo 486, Suidas, entry under Βακχυλίδης). His floruit was given ... More

Baton, New Comedy poet  

Geoffrey Arnott

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Baton, mid-3rd cent. bce; an anecdote links him (if his name is rightly conjectured at Plut. Mor. 55c; cf. J. Traversa, Index Stoicorum Herculanensis (1952) col. 22 = SVF 1, fr. 471 von Arnim) with ... More

Batrachomyomachia  

A. Sens

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The Batrachomyomachia (BM), the “Battle of Frogs and Mice,” is a mock epic poem of slightly more than 300 dactylic hexameter verses, broadly imitating the language and style of Homer. The poem was ... More

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