You are looking at  101-120 of 266 articles  for:

Clear All

View:

Gaius (2), Roman jurist  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Gaius (2), the famous 2nd-cent. ce law teacher, was lecturing in 160/1 and still alive in 178. Though a Roman citizen, he was known, and apparently chose to be known, by the single undistinctive name ... More

gromatici  

Brian Campbell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Roman land-surveyors. They were more commonly called mensores or agrimensores, gromatici being a late term derived from the groma, which was the most important of the surveyor's instruments, used to ... More

guardianship, Roman  

Adolf Berger, Barry Nicholas, and Susan M. Treggiari

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Roman law distinguished tutela and cura as types of guardianship of persons sui iuris, i.e. those not subject to father or husband (by *patria potestas or *manus (see marriage law)). Tutela concerned ... More

Herennius Modestinus  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Herennius Modestinus, a lawyer of the first half of the 3rd cent. ce and a pupil of *Ulpian, had connections in *Pontus (northern Turkey). In *Caracalla's reign he consulted Ulpian from Dalmatia, ... More

Hermogenianus, Aurelius (?), Roman lawyer, late 3rd and early 4th cent. CE  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Roman lawyer of a systematic cast of mind, he came from the eastern empire and, to judge from evidence both of style and access to material, was *Diocletian's *magister libellorum (master of ... More

honestiores  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
The Romans made a broad distinction, which was at first social but acquired in the Principate and thereafter an increasing number of legal consequences, between an upper class usually ... More

immunitas  

Graham Burton

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Immunitas was the exemption of a community or an individual from obligations to the Roman state or of an individual from obligations to a local community. As regards Roman taxation cities acquired ... More

imperium  

Peter Sidney Derow

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Imperium was the supreme power, involving command in war and the interpretation and execution of law (including the infliction of the death penalty), which belonged at Rome to the kings (see rex) ... More

indictio  

Arnold Hugh Martin Jones

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Indictio under the Principate meant the compulsory purchase of food, clothing, and other goods for the army and the court. Owing to the inflation of the mid-3rd cent. ce the ... More

infamia  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Infamia as a legal term embraces a variable number of disabilities (the common one being an incapacity to act or appear for another at law—postulare pro aliis) imposed in a ... More

inheritance, Roman  

David Johnston

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Among the propertied classes of Rome testation was regarded as a duty (officium). But where there was no will or it was invalid, the first claimants were the sui heredes (those in the paternal power ... More

iniuria and defamation  

R. Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Many disputes surround the meaning of the term iniuria in 8. 4 of the *Twelve Tables: ‘If he has committed an iniuria the penalty is 25’ (Si iniuriam faxsit, XXV poenae sunto). It is not even clear ... More

institores  

Jean-Jacques Aubert

Online publication date:
May 2016
Because of the traditional reluctance of the Roman elite to engage personally in profit-oriented economic activities other than agriculture (Cic., Off. 1.151), entrepreneurs of all kinds ... More

institutes  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Institutes (institutiones). This was one of the titles given to elementary textbooks of Roman law. The best-known work of this kind is the Institutes of *Gaius(2). This was taken by *Justinian as the ... More

intercessio  

Andrew Dominic Edwards Lewis

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Intercessio, ‘interposition’, was the right of one Roman magistrate (see magistracy, roman) to veto the activity of another magistrate of equal or lesser authority. The ... More

interpolation  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Interpolation is the name given to retrospective changes in (legal) texts, especially those made by the compilers of Justinian's 6th-cent. ce codification (see justinian's codification) in ... More

interrex  

Andrew Drummond

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Under the Roman republic, if both *consuls died or left office (together with the remaining ‘patrician' magistrates) without successors appointed, the ‘auspices reverted to the ‘patres’. ... More

iudex  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
In the Roman civil process, with its division into two stages, before the magistrate (in iure) and before the judge (apud iudicem), the iudex was a private person taken from the higher social classes ... More

iudicium populi  

Adolf Berger, Barry Nicholas, and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Iudicium populi Is the term used by *Cicero for a trial before an assembly. Before the growth of *quaestiones such trials may have simply been classed as iudicia publica. According to Cicero (Dom.45) ... More

Iulianus  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Iulianus (Lucius Octavius Cornelius Publius Salvius Iulianus Aemilianus), an important Roman lawyer of the 2nd cent. ce, came from Hadrumetum (Hammamet) in Africa (Tunisia) and was a pupil of ... More

View: