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Euthydemus (1), of Chios, sophist  

William David Ross

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
*Sophist and an older contemporary of *Socrates. In the Euthydemus*Plato (1) presents him as a ridiculous figure. He has sometimes been thought to be unhistorical and merely a mask for Plato's ... More

Eutocius  

Reviel Netz

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Active in the early 6th cent. ce, Eutocius apparently was a pupil of the Neo-Platonist *Ammonius (2) Sacca (Commentary on Archimedes I, intr.), and perhaps a colleague of Anthemius of Tralles ... More

Fabius Gallus, Marcus  

M. T. Griffin

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Marcus Fabius Gallus, Epicurean (see epicurus) friend of Cicero, who addresses to him Fam 7. 23–7. In 45 bce he was among those who wrote anti-Caesarian eulogies of M. *Porcius Cato (2). ... More

Favorinus, sophist, philosopher, and man of letters, c. 85–155 CE  

M. B. Trapp

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Favorinus (Φαβωρῖνος, born in Arelate (mod. Arles), learned Greek in (?) Marseilles (see massalia), and worked exclusively in that language for the whole of his professional career; he may also have ... More

flight of the mind  

M. J. Edwards

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
In *Pindar (fr. 292 SnellMaehler) and *Bacchylides (5. 16ff) flight is a metaphor for elevation of poetic style. The philosopher *Parmenides (DK 28 B 1) spoke of his own ascent to knowledge as a ... More

friendship, ritualized  

G. Herman

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Friendship, ritualized (or guest-friendship), a bond of trust, imitating kinship and reinforced by rituals, generating affection and obligations between individuals belonging to separate social ... More

Gnosticism  

John Dillon

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Gnosticism is a generic term primarily used of theosophical groups which broke with the 2nd-cent. Christian Church; see christianity. A wider, more imprecise use of the term describes a ... More

Gorgias (1) of Leontini, orator, c. 485–c. 380 BCE  

Josh Wilburn

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Gorgias of Leontini, orator, c. 485–c. 380 bce, was one of the most well-known and influential of the early Greek rhetoricians. He spent much of his life as an itinerant speaker and ... More

Hecataeus (2), of Abdera, author of philosophical ethnographies, c. 360–290 BCE  

Klaus Meister

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Hecataeus (2) of *Abdera, c. 360–290 bce, author of philosophical ethnographies, pupil of *Pyrrhon the sceptic (FGrH 264 T 3), visited Egyptian *Thebes(2) (T 4) under *Ptolemy(1) I (305–283).(1) On ... More

Hecaton, of Rhodes, ?  

Julia Annas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Philosophy
Hecaton of Rhodes?, Stoic (see stoicism), pupil of *Panaetius, wrote mainly on ethics and was, after Panaetius and *Posidonius(2), the most influential Stoic of the ‘middle Stoic’ period. ... More

Hegesias (1), Cyrenaic philosopher  

C. C. W. Taylor

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Philosophy
Hegesias (1), philosopher of the *Cyrenaic school (c.290 bce). He was nicknamed Πεισιθάνατος (‘Death-persuader’) because his emphasis on the ills of human life was thought to encourage ... More

Hellenistic philosophy  

Brad Inwood

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Philosophy
While the history of Greco-Roman philosophy is essentially continuous, it has long been customary to recognize distinct periods, each with its own characteristics. ‘Hellenistic philosophy’ is one ... More

Heraclides (1) Ponticus, philosopher, 4th cent. BCE  

David John Furley

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
4th cent. bce philosopher of the *Academy. Born of a wealthy and aristocratic family in *Heraclea (3) Pontica, he came to *Plato(1)'s Academy in Athens as a pupil of *Speusippus. Like ... More

Heraclitus (1), son of Bloson of Ephesus, fl. c. 500 BCE  

Martha C. Nussbaum and Malcolm Schofield

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Heraclitus (1) (fl. c. 500 bce), son of Bloson of Ephesus. Of aristocratic birth, he may have surrendered the (honorific) *kingship voluntarily to his brother. He is said to have compiled a book and ... More

Herillus, of Carthage  

Julia Annas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Philosophy
Herillus of Carthage, pupil of *Zeno(2), who developed Stoic ideas (see stoicism) in a distinctive way which lost currency and came to seem unorthodox after *Chrysippus' writings established Stoic ... More

Hermarchus, of Mytilene  

William David Ross, Dirk Obbink, and Malcolm Schofield

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Hermarchus, of *Mytilene, Epicurean, studied under *Epicurus in Mytilene before the school was moved to *Lampsacus in 306 bce, and in 271 he succeeded Epicurus as head of the school. Epicurus' will ... More

Hermippus (2), of Smyrna, biographer, fl. 3rd cent. BCE  

Robert Sharples

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Hermippus (2), of Smyrn (fl. 3rd cent. bce), follower of *Callimachus(3), biographer of philosophers, writers, and lawgivers. *Plutarch and *Diogenes(6) Laertius used him as a source; his role in the ... More

Hierocles  

Julia Annas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Philosophy
Hierocles, Stoic (see stoicism) of the time of *Hadrian (117–38 ce) wrote (1) an Elements of Ethics, of which we have the beginning on papyrus; this may have been an introduction to (2) a work on ... More

Hierocles' Synekdemos  

L. M. Whitby

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Philosophy
A list of cities in the eastern Roman empire, recorded by province, in geographical (not administrative) order. The date, which depends on the inclusion or exclusion of dynastic names for particular ... More

Hierocles of Alexandria  

Hermann S. Schibli

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Subject:
Philosophy
Hierocles of Alexandria (to be distinguished from Hierocles, Stoic) was a Neoplatonic philosopher whose studies, teaching, and writing took place in the first half of the 5th centuryce, corresponding ... More

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