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mysteries, Bacchic  

Fritz Graf

Online publication date:
Jun 2018
Mystery cults of Dionysos are attested to in Greece from the late Archaic epoch and expanded to Rome in Hellenistic times. They appear in two forms, the group (thíasos) of ecstatic women ... More

saeculum  

Susan Bilynskyj Dunning

Online publication date:
Nov 2017
In Roman conceptions of time, the saeculum became the longest fixed interval, calculated as a period of 100 or 110 years (as opposed to, e.g., a lustrum of only five years; cf. “census”). ... More

androgyny  

Luc Brisson

Online publication date:
Feb 2017
In the modern use, “bisexuality” refers to sexual object choice, whereas “androgyny” refers to sexual identity. In ancient Greece and Rome, however, these terms sometimes refer to human ... More

epigraphy, Etruscan  

Jean Turfa

Online publication date:
Feb 2017
The study of the inscriptions written in the Etruscan language and alphabet, usually texts incised on stone, pottery, or metal objects, or occasionally on more fragile media such as ink-on-cloth. ... More

folktale  

William Hansen

Folktales are traditional fictional stories. Unlike works of original literary fiction, they are normally anonymous narratives that have been transmitted from one teller to another over an ... More

Agonium  

C. Robert Phillips

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Agonium, name for 9 January, 17 March, 21 May, and 11 December in the Roman calendar; also Agonalia (Ov. Fast. 1. 324; possibly Agnalia at 1. 325), Agonia (Varro, Ling. 6. 14), and Dies agonales ... More

aius locutius  

Herbert Jennings Rose and J. Linderski

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Aius locutius (or loquens), the divine voice, ‘sayer and speaker’, that warned of the coming of the Gauls shortly before the battle of the *Allia. The warning was not heeded. As ... More

altars, Roman  

Frederick Norman Pryce, John Boardman, Antony Spawforth, and J. Linderski

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The Latin terms altaria (plur.) and ara (variously explained by Roman antiquarians) derive from the roots denoting ‘burning’ (of sacrificial offerings). Normally of stone, of varying size, ... More

Amburbium  

C. Robert Phillips

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amburbium, *lustration for Rome, seldom so named (Serv. on Verg. Ecl. 3. 77; SHA Aurel. 20. 3), usually linked with the *Ambarvalia's lustration of the fields (Festus Gloss. ... More

amulets  

H. S. Versnel

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Amulets were magically potent objects worn (hence the Greek names: περίαμμα, περίαπτον) for protection against witchcraft, illness, the evil eye, accidents, robbery, etc. (hence the Greek name: ... More

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