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Aeneas  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aeneas, character in literature and mythology, son of *Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite. In the Iliad he is a prominent Trojan leader, belonging to the younger branch of the royal house, (13. ... More

Albunea  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Albunea, sulphurous spring and stream near *Tibur with a famous waterfall, and its homonymous nymph (cf. Hor. Carm. 1. 7. 12), classed as a *Sibyl by *Varro (Lactant. Div. Inst. 1. 6. 12) ... More

Apollonius (12), of Tyana  

Herbert Jennings Rose and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Apollonius (12), of Tyana (ἈπολλώνιοςὁΤυανεύς), a Neo-pythagorean holy man (see neopythagoreanism), conceivably the L. Pompeius Apollonius of an inscription from *Ephesus (C. P. Jones in Demoen and ... More

Ascanius  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Ascanius, character in literature and mythology, son of *Aeneas. Not mentioned in Homer, he appears in the Aeneas-legend by the 5th cent. bce, at first as one of several sons of Aeneas (Hellanicus, ... More

Dido  

Cyril Bailey and Philip Hardie

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Legendary queen of *Carthage, daughter of a Phoenician king of Tyre, called Belus by *Virgil. According to *Timaeus (2), the earliest extant source for her story, her *Phoenician name was Elissa, and ... More

folktale  

William Hansen

Folktales are traditional fictional stories. Unlike works of original literary fiction, they are normally anonymous narratives that have been transmitted from one teller to another over an ... More

ghosts  

Esther Eidinow

Identifying a ghost in Greek literature and distinguishing it from what we might call a delusion or a supernatural entity can sometimes pose difficulties: *Homer tends to use the term ... More

Nisus (2), mythical Trojan hero  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Nisus (2), Trojan hero in Virgil's Aeneid, son of Hyrtacus, sympathetically presented as the devoted older lover of the young and headstrong Euryalus. He helps Euryalus to victory in the ... More

Ovid, poet, 43 BCE–17 CE  

Stephen Hinds

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 bce–17 ce), poet, was born at *Sulmo in the Abruzzi on 20 March. Our chief source for his life is one of his own poems, Tr. 4. 10. As the son of an old equestrian ... More

Palinurus  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Palinurus, in mythology, helmsman of *Aeneas (Dion. Hal. 1. 53. 2). In *Virgil's Aeneid he is overcome by the god Sleep (Somnus), falls overboard, is washed up on the shore of Italy, and there killed ... More

Panthous  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Panthous (ΠάνθουςΠάνθοος), Trojan elder in *Homer's Iliad (3. 146); his son *Polydamas is protected by *Apollo (Il. 15. 522), who may have rescued Panthous himself from Troy (Pind., Pae. 6.73 ff.). ... More

phallus  

Richard Seaford

Phallus, an image of the penis, often as erect, to be found in various contexts, in particular (a) in certain rituals associated with fertility, notably Dionysiac *processions (see dionysus): see ... More

Pyramus and Thisbe  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Pyramus and Thisbe are the hero and heroine of a love story mainly known from Ovid, Met., 4. 55–165. They were next-door neighbours in Babylon, and, as their parents would not let them marry, they ... More

Testamentum Porcelli  

Leofranc Holford-Strevens

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The purported will (4th cent. ce) of a piglet before slaughter at the Saturnalia, parodying the informal military will; beloved of schoolboys and deplored by Jerome, it expresses barbed ... More

Turnus (1), Italian hero  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Turnus (1), Italian hero, in *Virgil son of Daunus and the *nymph Venilia and brother of the nymph Juturna; the Greek tradition calls him ‘Tyrrhenus’, suggesting an *Etruscan link (Dion. ... More

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