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date: 18 December 2018

Summary and Keywords

Performers of Asian ancestry worked in a variety of venues and media as part of the American entertainment industry in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Some sang Tin Pan Alley numbers, while others performed light operatic works. Dancers appeared on the vaudeville stage, periodically in elaborate ensembles, while acrobats from China, India, and Japan wowed similar audiences. Asians immigrants also played musical instruments at community events. Finally, small group lectured professionally on the Chautauqua Circuit.

While on the stage, these performers had to navigate American racial attitudes that tried to marginalize them. To find steady work, performers of Asian ancestry often had to play to stereotypes popular with white audiences. Furthermore, they faced oversight by immigration authorities, who monitored their movements in and around the country and made it difficult for foreign entertainers to work in the country for long periods of time.

Despite these hurdles, Asians and Asian Americans have appeared in the performing arts in the United States for over one hundred years.

Keywords: pre–World War II, performing arts, vaudeville, circuses, dime museums, human curiosities, world expositions, Chautauqua, yellowface, night clubs

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