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date: 26 November 2022

Farming and Herding in Eastern Africa: Archaeological and Historical Perspectiveslocked

Farming and Herding in Eastern Africa: Archaeological and Historical Perspectiveslocked

  • Freda Nkirote M'MbogoriFreda Nkirote M'MbogoriDepartment of Cultural Heritage, National Museums of Kenya

Summary

The inception of agriculture in eastern Africa is a major topic of discussion among Africanist archaeologists, although very sparse evidence exists. Questions range from whether domestication was a local invention or whether it was introduced from the Near East, Asia, or elsewhere outside of Africa. These questions have remained unanswered because wild progenitors and models of the spread of African domesticates are yet to be established using undisputable data. The paucity of direct data has therefore necessitated the use of objects of material culture such as pottery, beads, burial cairns, architectural structures, and so on as indicators of pastoralism and cereal farming. In addition to the origins of African domesticates, research in eastern Africa has concerned itself with questions of farming technologies from later archaeological and historical times to the present. The remains of elaborate farming systems with extensive irrigation networks have drawn considerable attention. Though not unchanged, some of these farming systems remain in contemporary use in Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia.

Subjects

  • Archaeology
  • East Africa and Indian Ocean
  • Economic History

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