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date: 23 February 2024

Commerce and Economy in Southeast Asia within the Sinosphere (Laos and Vietnam)locked

Commerce and Economy in Southeast Asia within the Sinosphere (Laos and Vietnam)locked

  • James A. AndersonJames A. AndersonUniversity of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of History

Summary

Before the 16th century, Southeast Asian trade within the Sinosphere (Laos and Vietnam) took place in a maritime trade network that drew together the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea (Eastern Sea). Land-based and maritime trade routes were interlinked across this region. Behind the maritime trade was the upland supply of forest products that included many of the items most desired by distant markets in China and Southeast Asian destinations. The upland access to trade items was as important as was control of the coastal ports. Westerners arrived in the early modern period, as others had, as traders, and were accommodated into established trading patterns. The general current of anti-imperialism was still to come in the 20th century.

Subjects

  • Southeast Asia

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