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Science, Technology, and Religion in Chosŏn Korea  

Don Baker

During the 518 years of Korea’s Chosŏn dynasty (1392–1910), many things changed and many things stayed the same. After the Yi family established the Chosŏn dynasty, Confucianism became the ... More

Ships and Shipping in Southeast Asia  

Pierre-Yves Manguin

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Southeast Asian polities were destined to play an active role in the world economy because of their location at the crossroads of East Asian maritime routes and their richness in ... More

Ships, Shipwrecks, and Archaeological Recoveries as Sources of Southeast Asian History  

Derek Heng

Online publication date:
Sep 2018
Ships form a critical component of the study of Southeast Asia’s interaction both within itself as well as with the major centers of Asia and the West. Shipwreck data, accrued from ... More

South Asia in the Great Divergence Debate  

Kaveh Yazdani

Since the seminal publication of Kenneth Pomeranz’s The Great Divergence (2000), there has been a continuing upsurge of writings on the possible reasons behind the rise of the West from a ... More

South Korea’s Economic Development, 1948–1996  

Michael J. Seth

Online publication date:
Dec 2017
At its independence in 1948, South Korea was an impoverished, predominately agricultural state, and most of the industry and electrical power was in North Korea. It faced a devastating war ... More

Spatial Organization of Chinese Imperial Government and Society  

Nicolas Tackett

Online publication date:
Mar 2018
Despite important continuities in imperial practices and bureaucratic structures, the spatial organization of Chinese government and society evolved in significant ways over the course of ... More

Tamerlane and the Timurids  

Beatrice Forbes Manz

Online publication date:
Apr 2018
The Timurid dynasty was founded in 1370 by the Turkic warlord Temür, usually known in the west as Tamerlane (Temür the lame). Rising to power within the realm of Chinggis Khan’s second son ... More

Tea, Porcelain, and Silk: Chinese Exports to the West in the Early Modern Period  

Ronald C. Po

Online publication date:
Apr 2018
Tracing the social lives of tea, porcelain, and silk, it is discernible that the world had been living with commodities made in and exported from China for a fairly long period of time. ... More

The 1989 Tiananmen Movement and Its Aftermath  

Rowena Xiaoqing He

Online publication date:
Dec 2017
In spring 1989, millions of Chinese took to the streets calling for reforms. The nationwide movement, highlighted by a hunger strike in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, ended on June 4 with ... More

Trade in the East and South China Seas, 600 CE to 1800 CE  

Tamara H. Bentley

Online publication date:
Sep 2018
In the period from 600 ce to 1800 ce, the countries bordering the East and South China Seas were in frequent maritime communication, sharing in the process cultural practices and ... More

Transregional Trade in Early Modern Eurasia  

Matthew Romaniello

Online publication date:
Oct 2017
When the Mongol Empire expanded across Eurasia in the 13th century, it not only established a new political order but also unified the trade networks that spread across northern Eurasia, ... More

Treaty Ports and the Foreign Community in Modern China  

Pär Cassel

Online publication date:
May 2018
Unlike other parts of the non-European world, China was never fully colonized by the Western imperial powers during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Instead, the Western powers ... More

Understanding China’s News Media in Historical Perspective  

Sei Jeong Chin

Online publication date:
Jan 2019
Subject:
China, Cultural
The Chinese media has been discussed either as a challenge to the authoritarian regime or as an instrument to consolidate state power in the recent debates concerning the impact of the ... More

Unfree Labor in Colonial South Asia  

Andrea Major

Various forms of labor obligation, coercion, and oppression existed in colonial India, but the supposed dichotomy between “free” and “unfree” labor was rarely absolute. European ... More

The Uyghur Empire (744–840)  

Michael R. Drompp

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
The Uyghurs (Chinese Huihe迴 紇, Huihu回鶻) were a pastoral nomadic people living in the region of the Selenga and Orkhon river valleys in modern Mongolia; they spoke a Turkic language. The ... More

The Uyghurs in Modern China  

Rian Thum

Online publication date:
Apr 2018
Subject:
China, Political
The Uyghurs are a Turkic-speaking ethnic group, most of whom live today within the People’s Republic of China. Virtually all Uyghurs are Muslims, and most are oasis farmers, small-time ... More

The Uyghurs: Making a Nation  

David Brophy

The Uyghurs comprise a Turkic-speaking and predominantly Muslim nationality of China, with communities living in the independent republics of Central Asia that date to the 19th century, ... More

Visual Culture in Imperial China  

Julia K. Murray

Online publication date:
Feb 2018
The study of visual culture in imperial China is a young and heterogeneous field that encompasses a large and shifting array of visual materials and viewing practices. Because of the many ... More

Warfare and Arms of the Early Iron Age Steppe Nomads  

Oleksandr Symonenko

Online publication date:
Jun 2017
At the turn of Bronze and Early Iron Ages, the nomads of the Eurasian steppe brought about a new and progressive phenomenon in world military history: cavalry warfare. Spanning the vast ... More

Warfare in Premodern Southeast Asia  

Michael W. Charney

Online publication date:
Apr 2018
Warfare in premodern Southeast Asia, roughly that fought up until the end of the 19th century, was shaped by the environment across the region. Maritime trade connections brought the ... More

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