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date: 28 June 2022

External Corporate Governance Mechanisms: Linking Forces to Behaviorslocked

External Corporate Governance Mechanisms: Linking Forces to Behaviorslocked

  • G. Tyge PayneG. Tyge PayneE. J. Ourso College of Business, Louisiana State University
  •  and Curt MooreCurt MooreSpears School of Business, Oklahoma State University

Summary

Corporate governance research has a long and varied history, having evolved from a broad number of scholarly disciplines, including sociology, law, finance, and management. Across these various disciplines, it is maintained that governance is essential to corporate success, as it provides strategic and ethical guidance to the company. While research has largely focused on internal mechanisms through which governance is enacted (such as ownership arrangements, board structures, managerial rewards and incentives, etc.), external forces and mechanisms are increasingly important to modern businesses. External corporate governance mechanisms emanate from outside the organization and support forces that promote governance structures, processes, and practices by top executives and board directors. Institutions, industries, markets, networks, and strong individual external stakeholders all work to influence corporate governance decisions and behaviors both directly and indirectly. The external forces induce mechanisms that influence desirable behaviors or intervene when internal mechanisms are compromised or ineffective.

Recent literature on external governance mechanisms can help scholars and practitioners develop a better understanding of this important area of inquiry, and future research should consider three broad suggestions to move the field forward: differentiating between forces and mechanisms; recognizing unique stakeholders, boundaries, and levels of analysis; and improving empirical designs to better recognize and understand what factors matter in instituting governance adjustments and behavior changes.

Subjects

  • Business Policy and Strategy
  • Entrepreneurship
  • International Business
  • Organization Theory

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