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date: 01 October 2022

External Enablers of Entrepreneurshiplocked

External Enablers of Entrepreneurshiplocked

  • Per Davidsson, Per DavidssonJönköping International Business School, Jönköping University; Australian Centre of Entrepreneurship Research, Queensland University of Technology
  • Jan ReckerJan ReckerHamburg Business School, University of Hamburg
  •  and Frederik von BrielFrederik von BrielUQ Business School, University of Queensland

Summary

“External enabler” (EE) denotes nontrivial changes to the business environment—such as new technology, regulatory change, demographic and sociocultural trends, macroeconomic swings, and changes to the natural environment—that enable entrepreneurial pursuits. The EE framework was developed to increase knowledge accumulation in entrepreneurship and strategy research regarding the influence of environmental factors on entrepreneurial endeavors. The framework provides detailed structure and carefully defined terminology to describe, analyze, and explain the influence of changes in the business environment on entrepreneurial pursuits. EE characteristics specify the environmental changes’ range of impact in terms of spatial, sectoral, sociocultural, and temporal scope as well as the degree of suddenness and predictability of their onset. EE mechanisms specify the types of benefits individual ventures may derive from EEs. Among others, these include cost saving, resource provision, making possible new or improved products/services, and demand expansion. EE roles situate these (anticipated) mechanisms in entrepreneurial processes as triggering and/or shaping and/or outcome-enhancing. EE’s influence is conceived of as mediated by entrepreneurial agency that—in addition to agent characteristics—is contingent on the opacity (difficulty to identify) and agency-intensity (difficulty to exploit) of EE mechanisms, with the ensuing enablement being variously fortuitous or resulting from strategic deliberation.

Subjects

  • Business Policy and Strategy
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Information Systems
  • Organization Theory
  • Technology and Innovation Management

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