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Letter from the editor

Abbreviations

economy, Roman

economy rome

"The Roman economy was preindustrial, and most of the population was engaged in agricultural production. Agriculture and household production were salient features of the economy, along with urbanization, taxation, market exchanges, and slavery. Roman economic history is usually divided into three major chronological periods: the Republic (509 BCE–31 BCE), the principate (31 BCE–c. 284 CE), and the late empire (late 3rd–6th centuries CE)..." – By Annalisa Marzano

Sappho, lyric poet, c. 630-c. 570 BCE

Sappho

"The poet Sappho, one of the greatest poets of world literature, a rare example of a woman whose work has survived in appreciable measure from archaic Greece, was celebrated in antiquity as “the tenth Muse” (Anth. Pal. 9.506). The Garland of Meleager, a Hellenistic anthology, includes some verses of Sappho, which the poet calls “few, but roses...." – By Page duBois

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