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date: 25 June 2022

Caesarea (2) in Palaestinalocked

Caesarea (2) in Palaestinalocked

  • Joseph Patrich

Summary

Caesarea Maritima was founded (22–10/9 bce) by Herod (1) the Great. Named after Caesar Augustus, Herod’s patron, it served as the administrative capital and main port of his kingdom of Judaea, later the Roman province of Syria-Palaestina. Herod’s building projects are described in detail by Flavius Josephus (AJ 15.331–341; BJ 1.408–415). Many of its structures have been uncovered in the archaeological excavations carried out at the site since the 1950s. In 71 ce, Caesarea became a Roman colony and Latin became the official language. A praetorium for the financial procurator provinciae was erected there by Vespasian and Titus in 77/78 ce. In the 2nd–4th centuries it was a prosperous city where Gentiles, Jews, Samaritans, and Christians lived side by side. It was a centre of intellectual activity.

Subjects

  • Ancient Geography
  • Christianity
  • Jewish Studies
  • Roman History and Historiography

Updated in this version

Article rewritten to reflect current scholarship. Images added.

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