61-80 of 708 Results  for:

  • Greek Literature x
Clear all

Article

Anyte  

Gilbert Highet and Antony Spawforth

Anyte of *Tegea(fl. early 3rd cent. bc), an Arcadian poetess, much admired in her time and thereafter. About eighteen of her Doric epigrams, mostly funerary, are in the Greek Anthology, and one is cited by Pollux 5. 48. Her lyrics are lost, but she translated some of *Sappho's spirit into her sensitive elegiac quatrains.

Article

Apion  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes and Nigel Wilson

Apion (fl. 1st cent. ce), son of Posidonius, a Greek (or Graeco-Egyptian) born in El Kargeh oasis, where he studied under *Didymus (1) and succeeded *Theon (1) as head of the *Alexandrian school. He lectured in Rome and elsewhere. In ce 40 he was part of the delegation sent by the Greeks of *Alexandria (1) to *Gaius (1) (Caligula) after the anti-Jewish riots; Josephus attacked him at length in bk. 2 of Contra Apionem. He wrote on Egypt (see Gell. NA 5. 14 for the story of Androcles and the lion); he called up (so he said) *Homer's spirit to ascertain the poet's parentage and birthplace, but published no account of the proceedings (Plin. HN 30. 6. 18) and compiled, inter alia, an alphabetically arranged Homeric *glossary, based, as was usual, on *Aristarchus (2), and preserved only in fragments and in the derivative work of *Apollonius (11) Sophista.

Article

Apollodorus (2), of *Gela, New Comedy poet (see comedy (greek), new), contemporary of *Menander (1) (Sudaα 3405). He has sometimes been identified with *Apollodorus (3) of Carystus, but quoters (Ath. 3. 125a, 11. 472c; Poll. 4. 19, 10. 93, 138) and inscriptional evidence (cf. E. Capps, AJPhil 1900, 45 ff.

Article

Apollodorus (3), of Carystus, New Comedy poet (see comedy (greek), new), more famous than *Apollodorus (2) of Gela, and sometimes referred to as ‘the Athenian’ (which may imply the grant of Athenian *citizenship). He wrote 47 plays and won five victories (Sudaα 3404). A contemporary of *Posidippus (1), he produced his first play c.285 bce. His Ἑκύρα (‘Mother-in-law’) and Ἐπιδικαζόμενος (‘Claimant’) were respectively the models for *Terence's Hecyra and Phormio. These Latin adaptations seem to indicate that Apollodorus was greatly influenced by *Menander (1), and that one of his characteristics was a fussy attention to detail in the organization of his plots. Fr. 5: the folly of Greek fighting Greek.

Article

Apollodorus (5), of Pergamum, was the rhetor chosen by *Caesar to take charge of the education of C. Octavius, the future *Augustus, in 45 bce (Suet. Aug. 89). His ‘Art of Rhetoric’ (τέχνη) was translated into Latin by C. *Valgius Rufus (Quint. Inst. 3. 1. 18). The emphasis of his teaching seems to have been on firm argument and rather restrictive rules of composition: he insisted that all forensic speeches must consist of proem, narrative, proofs, and epilogue, in that order (see rhetoric). *Theodorus (3) of Gadara was his younger rival. Our knowledge of the doctrines of both of them is mainly derived from the *Anonymus Seguerianus (Spengel, Rhet. 1. 352–98).

Article

Apollodorus (6), of Athens (c.180–after 120 bce), studied in Athens with the Stoic *Diogenes (3) of Babylon, collaborated with *Aristarchus (2) in Alexandria, perhaps fled (in 146 ?), probably to *Pergamum, and later lived in Athens. A scholar of great learning and varied interests, he was the last of a series of intellectual giants in *Alexandria (1).1.Chronicle (Χρονικά) was based on the researches of *Eratosthenes, although it extended coverage beyond the death of *Alexander (3) the Great to Apollodorus' time. Written in comic trimeters which made it easy to memorize, it covered successive periods of history, philosophical schools, and the life and work of individuals from the fall of Troy (1184) to 146/5; later it was continued to 119 or 110/9 bce. Apollodorus frequently synchronized events and used archon lists for dating. .

Article

John Francis Lockwood and Robert Browning

Apollonius (11) Sophista (c. 100 ce) compiled a Lexicon Homericum which is extant in an abridged form (ed. I. Bekker, 1833). A fragment of the unabridged work survives in a Bodleian papyrus. He used especially the commentaries of *Aristarchus (2), on whose critical method he throws valuable light, and the glossary of *Apion.

Article

Peter Barr Reid Forbes, Robert Browning, and Nigel Wilson

Apollonius (13), son of Mnesitheus, nicknamed Dyscolus, of *Alexandria (1) (2nd cent. ce). Of his life little is known; apart from a short visit to Rome, he did not leave Alexandria, and it is not certain that he taught in a school. His works are distinguished, even among grammarians, for obscurity of style and asperity of manner; but his method is genuinely critical, and his zeal for correcting errors extends to his own (cf. Syntax, p. 231. 15 Bekker). For the history of grammar from *Dionysius (15) Thrax, to his own day he is our chief source of information, especially for Stoic linguistic philosophy. see grammar, grammarians, greek.Of some 20 works, mostly on syntax, named in the Suda, four survive (thanks to a single MS, Paris. gr. 2548): on the Pronoun, Conjunction, Adverb, and Syntax. A conspectus of his doctrines is given in the Syntax, which deals mainly with article, pronoun, verb, preposition, and adverb, successively.

Article

Richard Hunter

Apollonius (1) Rhodius, a major literary figure of 3rd-century bce*Alexandria (1), and poet of the Argonautica, the only extant Greek hexameter *epic written between *Homer and the Roman imperial period.Our main sources are: POxy. 1241, a 2nd-cent. ce list of the librarians of the Royal Library at *Alexandria; two Lives transmitted with the manuscripts of Argonautica which probably contain material deriving from the late 1st century bce; and an entry in the Suda. All four state that Apollonius was from Alexandria itself, though two 2nd-century ce notices point rather to *Naucratis. The most likely explanation for the title “Rhodian” is thus that Apollonius spent a period of his life there, which would accord well with what we know of his works, though it remains possible that he or his family came from *Rhodes. Apollonius served as librarian and royal tutor before .

Article

Apollonius (4) (2nd cent. bce), of *Alabanda, called ὁμαλακός (‘soft’, ‘cissy’), a pupil of Menecles, founded a school of rhetoric at Rhodes, visited by Q. *Mucius Scaevola (1) and M. *Antonius (1).

Article

Apollonius (5), ? 2nd cent. bce, author of Historiai thaumasiai, a *paradoxographical compilation from earlier writers, preserved in Palatinus Graecus 398.

Article

M. B. Trapp

Apollonius (9) Molon (1st cent. bce), of *Alabanda, rhetor and grammarian, was a pupil of Menecles; he lectured at Rhodes and visited Rome (87 and 81 bce), teaching *Cicero and other Romans, and was also successful as an advocate (see advocacy).

Article

Geoffrey Arnott

Apollophanes, Athenian Old *Comedy poet with one victory at the *Lenaea (IG 22. 2325. 132 = 5 C 1 col. 2. 6 Mette). In his Κρῆτες (Cretans) one character spoke Doric (fr. 7 KA = 6 K) (see dialects, greek).

Article

Appian  

Kai Brodersen

Appian (Ἀππιανός) of Alexandria, Greek historian. Born in Alexandria (1) at the end of the 1st centuryce, died in Rome c. 160ce; the inscription on a particular Roman sarcophagus (IGUR IV 1700) suggests that it may well be his. Appian experienced the Jewish uprising of 116/7ce, became a Roman citizen, moved to Rome as an advocate, and eventually gained, through the influence of his friend M. Cornelius Fronto, the dignitas (“honorary position”) of a procurator under Antoninus Pius, which enabled him to devote his time to writing his Roman History. After the preface and Book 1 on early Rome in the period of the kings, this work is arranged ethnographically, dealing with the individual peoples as Rome conquered them: Book 2 covers the Italians; Book 3, the Samnites; Book 4, the Celts; Book 5, the Sicilians; Book 6, the Iberians; Book 7, Hannibal; Book 8, the Carthaginians (as well as the Libyans and Nomads); Book 9, the Macedonians and Illyrians; Book 10, the Greeks and Ionians; Book 11, the Syrians (Seleucids) and Parthians; and Book 12, Mithridates VI.

Article

Apsines  

M. B. Trapp

Apsines, Athenian rhetor and rival of a Fronto of Emesa; author of On Figures, Investigations, and Declamations. His Rhetoric (Τέχνη), now heavily interpolated, drew extensively on *Hermogenes (2); it is the latest such work to survive complete.

Article

Araros  

Kenneth Dover

Araros (Ἀραρώς), son of *Aristophanes (1), produced (after 388 bce) two of his father's plays, Kokalos and Aiolosikon (hyp. 4 Ar. Plut,). The first play of his own was produced in 375; we have citations from five plays, and six titles.

Article

Peter Barr Reid Forbes and Robert Browning

Arcadius (1), of Antiocheia, a grammarian, of the later empire, who wrote a (lost) Ὀνοματικόν (table of noun inflexions). To him is falsely ascribed an extant epitome from *Herodian (1), probably made by Theodosius (end of 4th cent. ce), to which a spurious conclusion was added in the 16th cent.

Article

Geoffrey Arnott

Archedicus, New *Comedy poet, who slandered *Demochares, nephew of *Demosthenes (2) (fr. 4 and Polyb. 12. 13).

Article

Some 340 hexameters are preserved by *Athenaeus (1) from the Hēdupatheia (also cited as Gastronomia Deipnologia, and Opsopoiia), a culinary tour of the Mediterranean, which *Ennius was later to adapt. The poem imitates *Hesiod's Works and Days in the use of an addressee (Moschus) and a constant imperative tone, and occasionally borrows phraseology from Hesiod, but it is not specifically parodic (contrast *Matron).

Article

Archilochus of Paros is one of the earliest surviving Greek poets, and can be dated to the 7th century bce. He composed iambus and elegy, and is most famous for his invective poems, which range from light-hearted banter with friends to vitriolic attacks on his enemies, and whose tone can be high-flown or vulgar. Despite the later tradition that narrowed the reception of Archilochus’s work to focus almost exclusively on abuse poetry, he was in fact one of the most wide-ranging of the Greek poets. The topics he treats include battle narratives, erotic stories, philosophical reflection, political criticism, lamentations for men lost at sea, heroic myths, and animal fables. Archilochus’s work survives only in fragments, but in antiquity he was highly rated as a poet, and his work is distinctive for its energy, its care with language and imagery, and its lively persona. His influence can be seen on classical, Hellenistic, and Roman writers.