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marriage law, Roman  

Adolf Berger, Barry Nicholas, and Susan M. Treggiari

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Traditional expressions enshrine the view that a man took a wife for the procreation of children. According to the celebrated definition of *Herennius Modestinus adopted in the Digest, Roman marriage ... More

Masurius Sabinus  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Masurius Sabinus (RE 29), probably from *Verona, a leading Roman lawyer of the first half of the 1st cent. ce. He was successful as a law teacher in Rome and counted the powerful C. *Cassius ... More

meddix  

A. N. Sherwin-White and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Meddixtuticus or summus, assisted by a meddix minor, was the senior magistrate among the *Oscan-speaking peoples. His authority differed from that of the Romano-Latin praetura, to which some ... More

Mucius Scaevola (1), Quintus , 'Augur', Roman consul, 117 BCE  

Ernst Badian

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Quintus Mucius Scaevola (1), 'Augur', Stoic (see Stoicism), eminent lawyer, son-in-law of C. *Laelius(2), but probably, like P. *Mucius Scaevola, moderately Gracchan in sympathy (his ... More

Neratius Priscus, Lucius  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Lucius Neratius Priscus, an influential Roman lawyer from *Saepinum in *Samnium, was descended from the family of *Antistius Labeo's wife. He was *suffect*consul in ce 97 and later ... More

neutrality  

Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Neutrality, a word with no single Greek or Latin equivalent. In Greek, the idea is expressed by terms meaning e.g. ‘keeping quiet’, ‘helping neither side’. Individuals may be neutral between parties, ... More

nexum  

R. Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Nexum appears to have been a solemn transaction of the oldest Roman law, with copper and scales (per aes et libram), by which a man subjected himself to somebody else's power of seizure. Because of ... More

oath (in Roman law)  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
An oath (iusiurandum) was used in several ways in the stage before the magistrate (in iure) in Classical Roman civil proceedings. (1) In almost every action either party ... More

obligation  

R. Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Obligation was defined by Justinian (see justinian's codification) as ‘a legal tie which binds us to the necessity of making some performance in accordance with the laws of our state’ (Inst. 3. 13 ... More

ownership, Roman  

Adolf Berger, Barry Nicholas, and Alan Rodger

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Ownership (dominium), though apparently not defined by the Roman jurists, is the right to a thing, irrespective of whether the owner has any control or enjoyment of it. The owner's right to use his ... More

pagus  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Pagus, term of Roman administrative law for subdivisions of territories, referring to a space rather than a point, and thus convenient for subdividing areas where there was no focal settlement, and ... More

papyrology, Latin  

J. David Thomas

In comparison with Greek papyri, Latin papyri are uncommon, even when “papyri” is understood in a wide sense so as to include *ostraca and parchment scraps. This is so because the vast majority of ... More

parricidium  

Adolf Berger, Barry Nicholas, and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Parricidium meant the killing of a par, i.e. originally perhaps a member of a sib or clan, later a close relative. In a law attributed to king *Pompilius Numa (Festus, entry under Parricidium) any ... More

patria potestas  

Barry Nicholas and Susan M. Treggiari

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Patria potestas was the power of a Roman male ascendant, normally father or grandfather (paterfamilias), over descendants through males (liberi), provided that his marriage was valid in Roman law ... More

patrimonium and res privata  

Graham Burton

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Patrimonium and res privata were divisions of the property of the Roman emperors, whose precise nature and interrelation remain obscure. Through a complex process of gifts, legacies, and ... More

patrum auctoritas  

Arnaldo Momigliano and Tim Cornell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Patrum auctoritas was the assent given by the ‘fathers’ (patres) to decisions of the Roman popular assemblies. The nature of this assent is unclear, but it may have been a matter of confirming that ... More

peculium  

Alan Rodger

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Persons in (someone else's) power could not own property, but, while technically having ownership, a father could allow his son, and a master his slave, to administer certain assets. These assets ... More

Pedius, Sextus, Roman lawyer  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Probably of the mid-2nd cent. ce, known only from citations by *Iulius Paulus and *Domitius Ulpianus which point to a powerful mind. He may be identical with the *suffect consul Sex. ... More

Pegasus (2), (Plo?)tius  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
(Plo?)tius Pegasus (2), an erudite Roman lawyer (‘a book, not a man’), son of a naval captain, who despite his father's low status as a freedman became suffect consul about 71 ce, when he ... More

perduellio  

Barry Nicholas and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Perduellio (from perduellis = hostis) was the crime of activity hostile to the state. It covered a much wider field of offences than consorting with the enemy against the ... More

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