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golden age  

Peta G. Fowler and Don P. Fowler

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
An imagined period in early human history when human beings lived a life of ease, far from toil and sin. The most important text is *HesiodOp. 109–26 (see West's comm.), which talks of a ‘golden ... More

Heliodorus (4), Greek novelist, c. 4th century CE  

Benedek Kruchió

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Heliodorus was the author of the Aethiopica, the latest and longest Greek novel to survive from antiquity. In his work, Heliodorus claims to be a Phoenician from Emesa, but there are good ... More

Hellenism, Hellenization  

Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Greek culture (cf. hellen; hellenes) and the diffusion of that culture, a process usually seen as active. The relation between the two modern words is controversial: should the longer word be avoided ... More

Horatii, oath of the  

Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Reception

Subject of a painting exhibited in 1785 by J.-L. David, who however appears to have made up the idea of the oath, though the men depicted are certainly the famous legendary *Horatii.

imitatio  

Gian Biagio Conte and Glenn W. Most

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Imitatio (μίμησις), the study and conspicuous deployment of features recognizably characteristic of a canonical author's style or content, so as to define one's own generic affiliation (see ... More

inconsistencies in Latin literature  

Patrick Glauthier

Online publication date:
Apr 2019
In the context of Latin literature, inconsistency is most often invoked to mean self-contradiction: for example, in the second Georgic, Virgil declares that Italy is blissfully free from ... More

Julius Caesar, reception of  

W. Jeffrey Tatum

Online publication date:
Feb 2017
The reception of Caesar constitutes, for obvious reasons, an immense topic. As a political idea, Caesar exhibits from the very beginning a tension between his role as dictator and ... More

law, Roman, institutional scheme of  

Jakob Fortunat Stagl

Online publication date:
Jul 2016
The institutional scheme of Roman law was developed primarily by Gaius on the basis of a preceding tradition of law manuals. The scheme consists of dividing the law into a General Part, ... More

literary criticism in antiquity  

Donald Russell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
1. The arts of formal speech played a great part in ancient life, so that it was natural that vocabularies and conceptual frameworks should be developed for the purposes of evaluation, speculation ... More

literary theory and the classics  

Michael Silk

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Reception
Western literary theory is a long-established series of attempts to make sense of literary practice and experience over three millennia. There are at least four ways in which theory and ... More

locus amoenus  

Philip Hardie

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Locus amoenus, ‘charming place, pleasance’, a phrase (Cic. Fin. 2. 107; Isid. Etym. 14. 8. 33, etc. ) used by modern scholars to refer to the literary topos of the set description of an idyllic ... More

medism  

C. J. Tuplin

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
(rarely Persism, though see Strabo 14. 657: the ‘med-’ root is a linguistic fossil from the era of *Cyrus(1)'s conquest of *Lydia) is a term whose application is normally confined to states or ... More

midrash  

Martin Goodman

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Midrash, a type of exegesis of scriptural texts practised by *Jews. The genre of midrash is characterized by the use of an explicit citation of, or clear allusions to, a passage in an authoritative ... More

narrative, narration  

Massimo Fusillo

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
In the last 30 years, interest in narrative has developed at an incredible pace. Two branches of this ‘narratology’ may be distinguished. The one is oriented towards the ‘story’ as ... More

opera  

Michael Ewans

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Reception
Opera is one of the most important sites for the reception of Greek and Roman literature, history, and myth. Significant operas have been based on classical topics from the invention of ... More

paignion  

Michael Silk

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Paignion, the Greek equivalent of jeu d'esprit: an equivocal literary-critical label applied to various writings by their critics (dismissively) or their authors (apologetically or tongue-in-cheek). ... More

palimpsest  

Frederic George Kenyon and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Reception
Palimpsest (παλίμψηστος), a term applied to manuscripts in which the original text has been scraped or washed away, in order that another text may be inscribed in its place. As the term properly ... More

panhellenism  

P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Reception
Panhellenism, the idea that what the Greeks have in common as Greeks, and what distinguishes them from *barbarians, is more important than what divides them. The word is not an ancient one, though ... More

Persian-Wars tradition  

Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Reception
Greek victories over Persian ‘barbarians’ loomed large in defining mainland Greek identities until well into the Roman age. In *Thucydides (2) 5th-cent. Athens justified its empire by them (1. 74. ... More

philosophy, early modern reception of  

Anna Corrias

Online publication date:
Apr 2019
The early modern period saw a tremendous revival in interest in ancient philosophy. New Platonic texts became available. New ways of analyzing Aristotle were explored. Stoic and Epicurean ... More

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