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Siculus Flaccus, writer, uncertain date  

Brian Campbell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

On surveying, discussed types of land tenure in Italy and the provinces, and boundary designation. See gromatici.

Sicyon  

John Salmon

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sicyon, city west of *Corinth: they shared a proverbially rich coastal plain. The original site remains unknown: it was captured in 303 bce by *Demetrius (4) Poliorcetes and moved to an acropolis ... More

Side  

George Ewart Bean and Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Side, city with a good harbour on the coast of *Pamphylia. Founded according to *Eusebius in 1405 bce, it remained a *barbarian city until resettled by colonists from Aeolian *Cyme in the 7th or 6th ... More

Signia  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Signia, modern Segni, strongly placed at the north-east angle of the Volscian mountains in Latium. A Latin colony here (495 bce; see colonization, roman) helped contain the *Volsci. *Sulla defeated ... More

Sila  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Sila, the mountainous and heavily forested Aspromonte massif in *Calabria. Originally Bruttian territory (see bruttii), it was confiscated by Rome c.270 bce and its timber exploited for ... More

Simitthus  

R. J. A. Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Simitthus (mod. Chemtou in north-western Tunisia) lies in the fertile Bagradas valley at the crossroads of the major routes from Carthage to *Hippo Regius and from Thabraca (on the north coast) to ... More

Sindus  

Simon Hornblower

Archaeologically important (late Archaic and Classical) cemetery site near Thessaloniki (ancient *Thessalonica) in north Greece. The settlement was basically Thracian (see Thrace) but ... More

Siphnos  

R. W. V. Catling

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Siphnos, a mountainous island (74 km.2) in the south-western *Cyclades, noted for its mineral resources. *silver and *lead were mined at Agios Sostis in the early bronze age. At the end of the late ... More

Sipontum  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sipontum (mod. Siponto), in Italy, the port of *Arpi. Its legendary founder was *Diomedes (2) (Strabo 6. 3. 9), but its origins were *Daunian, not Greek. Its strategic position made it a magnet for ... More

Siris  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Siris (mod. Nova Siri), in S. Italy, 7th-cent. colony (Achaean or Ionian), on the river Sinni. It controlled good agricultural land, attaining great wealth, but was destroyed by *Sybaris, *Croton, ... More

Sirmium  

John Wilkes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sirmium, a strategically located city on the Sava in *Pannonia (Inferior), was probably originally the *oppidum of the Amantini (Plin.HN 3. 148). It was occupied by the Romans probably ... More

Sirtica  

Joyce Reynolds

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sirtica, semi-arid coastal area along the shore of the Greater Syrtis (Gulf of Sidra), home of Gaetuli, Marmaridae, and the Nasamones who were ‘forbidden to exist’ by the emperor *Domitian (Cass. ... More

Siscia  

John Wilkes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Siscia, called also Segesta (from the island between the rivers Savus and Colapis in which it stood, Plin.HN 3. 148, cf. App. Ill. 10. 22 f.), was a city in *Pannonia (Superior). Probably ... More

Sora  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sora, south-east of Rome, at the big bend of the river *Liris. Rome took Sora from the *Volsci in 345 bce, but Samnites (see samnium) disputed control of it until a Latin colony was ... More

Soracte  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The isolated mountain 691 m. (2,267 ft.) high to the north of Rome, from which it is sometimes visible. Celebrated by *Horace (Odes 1. 9), there were priests here called Hirpi, resembling ... More

Spain  

Simon J. Keay

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The geographical diversity of the Iberian peninsula enforced cultural heterogeneity. Native peoples drew upon abundant metal resources and rich agricultural areas to achieve a cultural balance ... More

Sparta  

Paul Cartledge, Stephen Hodkinson, and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sparta (‘the sown land’?) lies c. 56 km. (35 miles) south of *Tegea, and 48 km. (30 mi.) north of Gytheum, at the heart of the fertile alluvial valley of the Eurotas. See laconia. Very few ... More

Spelunca  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Spelunca (mod. Sperlonga), a natural grotto on the Tyrrhenian coast of Italy, where the emperor *Tiberius had a villa. *Aelius Seianus rescued him from a cave-in there. The grotto has ... More

Spina  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Spina, in N. Italy, situated on what was the mouth of the southern branch of the Po (*Padus), seems to have been established c.520–510 bce by *Etruscans; *Strabo's definition (5.1.7) of it ... More

Spoletium  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Spoletium (mod. Spoleto), in central Italy, a major iron-age settlement (with walls in polygonal masonry), which became a Latin colony (241 bce; see colonization, roman), and rendered valuable ... More

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