You are looking at  781-800 of 907 articles  for:

  • Ancient Geography x
Clear All

View:

Tanaïs  

David C. Braund

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tanaïs, the river Don and a city at its estuary, at the modern village of Nedvigovka. The river was usually taken to be the boundary between Europe and Asia (but see phasis). The river offered access ... More

Tarentum  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tarentum (Taras; mod. Taranto), in S. Italy, an 8th-cent. Spartan colony (see colonization, greek; sparta) dominating the best harbour on the gulf of Tarentum. The literary tradition dates it to 706 ... More

Tarpeian Rock  

Ian Archibald Richmond and John Patterson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
A precipitous cliff on the *Capitol from which murderers and traitors were thrown (see tarpeia). Some ancient sources (e.g. Varro, Ling. 5. 41) place it close to the temple of *Jupiter ... More

Tarquinii  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tarquinii (Etr. Tarχ(u)na-; mod. Tarquiniaformerly Corneto), the chief of the twelve cities of Etruria, stood on a high plateau about 90 km. (56 mi.) from Rome and 6 km. (3½ mi.) inland; it was the ... More

Tarracina  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tarracina (mod. Terracina), the former Volscian stronghold (see volsci) of Anxur. A citizen colony from 329 bce, it was the southern terminus of the *Pomptine Marshes canal, and an important station ... More

Tarraco  

Simon J. Keay

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tarraco (mod. Tarragona), on the north-east coast of *Spain, was placed on or near Iberian Cese (Κίσσα, Cissis), city of the Cessetani people. In 218 bce it was the base of P. Cornelius Scipio and ... More

Tarraconensis  

Simon J. Keay

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tarraconensis was the largest of Rome's Spanish provinces under the early empire. Its initial nucleus had been formed by the province originally (197 bce) called Hispania Citerior (Hither Spain), ... More

Tarsus  

Arnold Hugh Martin Jones and Stephen Mitchell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tarsus, a native Cilician (see cilicia) town with a long prehistoric past, which later claimed *Triptolemus, *Perseus(1), and above all *Heracles as its founder. It was capital of the Cilician kings ... More

Tartessus  

Simon J. Keay

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tartessus, a cultural grouping in south Spain between the lower Guadalquivir valley and the Guadiana which is often identified with biblical Tarshish. Tartessus developed from strong ... More

Tauromenium  

Arthur Geoffrey Woodhead and R. J. A. Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tauromenium (Ταυρομένιον; mod. Taormina), in eastern Sicily above *Naxos(2), was established in 396/5 bce by the Carthaginian *Himilco(2), who planted there on the site of a small existing settlement ... More

Taurus mountain range  

Eric Herbert Warmington

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Taurus mountain range, properly the mostly well-wooded heights (average 2,100 m./7,000 ft.) beginning in SW Asia Minor, and continuing along the coast of *Lycia and through *Pisidia and *Isauria to ... More

Teanum Apulum  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Teanum Apulum (modrtn S. Paolo), in central Italy, a *Daunian city, originally called Teate. It was on the borders between Daunian and Frentanian territory and shows signs of Oscanization ... More

Teanum Sidicinum  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Teanum Sidicinum (mod. Teano), in Italy, the second city of *Campania after *Neapolis (Naples), located on the *via Latina south-east of Roccamonfina. Inhabited from the 7th century bce, it grew ... More

Tegea  

James Roy

Tegea, a *polis of SE *Arcadia situated in a high upland basin crossed by important routes to *Argos(1), Sparta, and SW and E. Arcadia. The polis was formed from nine local communities, but when an ... More

Tegianum  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Tegianum (mod. Teggiano), in southern Italy, a Hellenized Lucanian (see hellenism; lucania) settlement in the Valle di Diano. There was Gracchan colonization (see sempronius gracchus, c.) in the 2nd ... More

Tegyra  

Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
North of *Orchomenus(1) and close to Lake *Copais in *Boeotia, site of an oracular sanctuary of *Apollo (Plut.Pelop.16; see leto and oracles) and of a battle in 375 bce when the Theban ... More

Telamon (2), Etruscan village  

Edward Togo Salmon and D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Telamon (2), modern Talamone on the coast of Etruria (midway between Rome and Pisa; see pisae), was already inhabited in *Etruscan times. Here the Romans annihilated the *Celts of Cisalpine Gaul (see ... More

Temesa  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Temesa, in S. Italy, a 6th-cent. bce Aetolian colony (see aetolia; colonization, greek) noted for its copper (Strabo 6. 1. 5), whose site is not identified. It fell under Bruttian control in the 4th ... More

Tempe  

Bruno Helly

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tempe, defile about 8 km. (5 mi.) long in NE *Thessaly by which the river Peneus reaches the sea. The common word tempē described all defiles, thessalika tempea all the passes giving ... More

templum Pacis  

Janet DeLaine

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Templum Pacis, later called forum Pacis or Vespasiani, was the precinct of the temple of Peace at Rome, dedicated by *Vespasian in 75 ce. The area (145×100 m.) was surrounded by marble ... More

View: