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Ratae  

Sheppard S. Frere and Martin Millett

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Ratae (mod. Leicester), a town of Roman *Britain and civitas-capital of the *Corieltauvi. An iron age *oppidum preceded the Roman settlement but its development under Rome remains ... More

roads  

Nicholas Purcell

Ancient road-theory divides into two categories: the art of enhancing communications through built or dug works; and the planning and maintaining of large-scale communications networks ... More

Rome, topography  

Ian Archibald Richmond, Ferdinando Castagnoli, and John Patterson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The Tiber valley at Rome is a deep trough, from 1 to 3 km wide, cut into the soft tufa floor of the river's lower basin. The edges of the trough are formed by steep weathered cliffs, ... More

Rusellae  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Rusellae (mod. Roselle), an *Etruscan city, stood on a two-crowned hill to the east of the bay that is now the Grosseto plain. Its walls, of polygonal limestone blocks overlaying a 7th ... More

Saalburg  

John Frederick Drinkwater

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Saalburg, near Bad Homburg, a strong point on the Upper German *limes, controlling traffic across the Taunus. Roman troops first occupied the position during the Chattian campaigns of ce ... More

San Giovenale  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
San Giovenale takes its name from the medieval castle on the plateau overlooking the river Vesca north of the Tolfa Hills, 25 km. east of *Tarquinii. The plateau was inhabited from the bronze age, ... More

Satricum  

Edward Togo Salmon and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Satricum (1), mod. Conca in *Latium. A Volscian centre (see volsci), originating in the 10th cent. bce. From the late 7th cent. it became an important cult and commercial centre, in which Rome took a ... More

Saturnia  

Edward Togo Salmon

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Minor *Etruscan hill town in the Albegna valley. It received a Roman colonia in 183 bce but is otherwise unrecorded in antiquity. Its surviving polygonal walls and interesting necropolis, ... More

Settefinestre  

T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Settefinestre, a Roman *villa near *Cosa in Tuscany. Built in the later 1st cent. bce, it may exemplify the rural residence and working farm of a senatorial aristocrat (possibly the family of the ... More

Spina  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Spina, in N. Italy, situated on what was the mouth of the southern branch of the Po (*Padus), seems to have been established c.520–510 bce by *Etruscans; *Strabo's definition (5.1.7) of it ... More

Stabiae  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Stabiae, with *Pompeii and *Nuceria an important pre-Roman settlement of the Sarno plain in south *Campania, destroyed by Sulla in the *Social War (3). The fashionable resort which ... More

Sufetula  

R. J. A. Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sufetula (mod. Sbeitla), a town of the High Plateaux in central Tunisia, stands at a major cross-roads, especially of the *Theveste–Thenae and Thelepte–*Hadrumetum highways. A Flavian *municipium ... More

Tarquinii  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tarquinii (Etr. Tarχ(u)na-; mod. Tarquiniaformerly Corneto), the chief of the twelve cities of Etruria, stood on a high plateau about 90 km. (56 mi.) from Rome and 6 km. (3½ mi.) inland; it was the ... More

Teanum Sidicinum  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Teanum Sidicinum (mod. Teano), in Italy, the second city of *Campania after *Neapolis (Naples), located on the *via Latina south-east of Roccamonfina. Inhabited from the 7th century bce, it grew ... More

templum Pacis  

Janet DeLaine

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Templum Pacis, later called forum Pacis or Vespasiani, was the precinct of the temple of Peace at Rome, dedicated by *Vespasian in 75 ce. The area (145×100 m.) was surrounded by marble ... More

tourism  

Antony Spawforth

Well-known Greek tourists include *Solon, said (Hdt. 1. 30) to have visited Egypt and Lydia ‘for the sake of seeing’ (theōria), and *Herodotus (1) himself. Sea-borne *trade and sightseeing were ... More

Utica  

William Nassau Weech, Brian Herbert Warmington, and R. J. A. Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Utica, by tradition the oldest Phoenician settlement on the north African coast, in Tunisia, 33 km. (21 mi.) north-east of *Tunis. The traditional foundation date of 1101 bce (Plin.HN 16. 216; Vell. ... More

Velabrum  

Ian Archibald Richmond and John Patterson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Velabrum, according to *Varro (Ling. 5. 43), the landing-place of an ancient ferry connecting the Aventine with the Palatine in Rome; more generally, an area of low ground between the Capitol and ... More

Vetulonia  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Vetulonia (Etr. Vetluna), in the hills to the west of the bay that is now the Grosseto plain, was one of the twelve cities of Etruria (see etruscans). Excavation has been mainly confined to the ... More

via Sacra  

Ian Archibald Richmond and John Patterson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Via Sacra, the ‘sacred way’, street connecting the *forum Romanum with the *Velia, affording access to the *Palatine. According to *Varro and *Pompeius Festus, the stretch of road ... More

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