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Donatus (2), Tiberius Claudius, late 4th–early 5th cent. CE?  

R. A. Kaster

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tiberius Claudius Donatus (2) (late 4th–early 5th cent. ce ?), wrote a long, line-by-line ‘interpretation’ of the Aeneid, dedicated to his son (Interpretationes Vergilianae, ed. H. ... More

Dositheus (2), author of a brief Latin grammar  

A. C. Dionisotti

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Author of a brief Latin grammar (ed. Keil, Gramm. Lat. 7. 376–436; J. Tolkiehn (1913)). His name is Greek, and one of the three manuscripts gives him the unadorned title magister (‘master’); no more ... More

Dossen(n)us  

Peter G. M. Brown

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

A stock character of *Atellana, a glutton, thought by some to have been a hunchback because of a supposed derivation of his name from dorsum, ‘back’.

Dracontius, Blossius Aemilius  

Alun Hudson-Williams and Frederick James Edward Raby

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Blossius Aemilius Dracontius, a Christian, a lawyer and vir clarissimus (Roman of senatorial rank), well trained in rhetoric, lived in *Carthage towards the end of the 5th cent. ce. For ... More

ecloga  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Ecloga (ἐκλογή), ‘selection’, used for a choice extract from a work (Varro, cited by Charisius, gram. 120. 28 Keil; Cic. Att. 16. 2. 6), or (by extension) for any short poem or poem within a ... More

education, Roman  

J. V. Muir

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
There is very little reliable evidence bearing upon formal education in the early period. Education was then certainly centred on the family and was probably based upon apprenticeship supervised by ... More

Einsiedeln Eclogues  

Lindsay Watson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Two incomplete Latin pastorals (see pastoral poetry, latin) comprising 87 hexameters, first published in 1869, and named after the Swiss monastery where they were discovered. They are the ... More

elegiac poetry, Latin  

Edward John Kenney and Stephen Hinds

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
*Ennius introduced the elegiac couplet into Latin (Isid. 1. 39. 15); four epigrams, epitaphic in form, survive under his name (var. 15–24 Vahlen; 43–6 Courtney). *Lucilius (1) (bks. 22–5) used the ... More

Elegiae in Maecenatem  

Petrus Johannes Enk

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Tradition ascribes to *Virgil two such elegies (wrongly combined in the MSS and divided by Scaliger). As they were written after *Maecenas' death (8 bce), Virgil (d. 19) cannot be the author. In the ... More

elocutio novella  

Leofranc Holford-Strevens

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Inauthentic but once fashionable name for the style of *Cornelius Fronto, Aulus *Gellius, and *Apuleius extracted from Fronto's comment on a speech by Marcus *Aurelius, nonnihil interdum ... More

Elogius, Quintus  

Christopher Pelling

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

Quintus Elogius (the name is very uncertain), Augustan writer of memoirs cited as an authority on the Vitellian family by *Suetonius (Vit. 1).

Ennianista  

Leofranc Holford-Strevens

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Self-description of entertainer who gave a well-received public reading of *Ennius at Puteoli (Gell. NA 18. 5); if modelled on performances by Homeristae, it included action. The story ... More

Ennius, Quintus, epic and dramatic poet, 239–169 BCE  

Gesine Manuwald

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Ennius was the most prolific poet in the early period of Latin literature and is particularly known for his epic and his dramas. He composed plays for public festivals down to the year of ... More

epic  

Philip Hardie

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
At the summit of the ancient hierarchy of genres, epic narrates in hexameter verse the deeds of gods, heroes, and men The authority of Homer, the name given to the composer of the Iliad ... More

epigram, Latin  

Mario Citroni

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
The use of metrical inscriptions in Latin is attested from the second half of the 3rd cent. bce. The two most ancient elogia in the tomb of the Scipios (CIL 12. 9, probably from around 230 bce, and ... More

epigraphy, Latin  

Joyce Reynolds

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
The study of Latin texts inscribed on durable objects, usually of stone or bronze. It is concerned both with the form of the inscriptions and with their content, and so impinges on many ... More

epitome, Latin  

R. A. Kaster

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Convenient and informative compendia based on the writings of others were being produced at Rome by the end of the republic, especially in history: M. *Iunius Brutus (1), for example, epitomized ... More

epyllion  

Edward Courtney and Gail Trimble

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Epyllion (diminutive of epos), term applied in modern (not ancient) times to some ‘short epics’, hexameter poems of mythological narrative in not more than one book. The texts most ... More

Euanthius  

Peter G. M. Brown

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Euanthius (4th cent. ce), author of a commentary on *Terence. The only parts remaining are some sections of the treatise on drama (De fabula) which is now prefixed to the commentary of ... More

Eugraphius  

Peter G. M. Brown

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Eugraphius (early 6th cent. ce), author of a commentary on *Terence (ed. P. Wessner in Donati Commentum, 3. 1). His interest is chiefly in the rhetorical qualities and characterization of the plays, ... More

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