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lex Ovinia  

Charles Bartlett

Online publication date:
Jan 2018
The lex Ovinia, or more properly, the plebiscitum Ovinium, is a plebiscite that transferred the power to determine membership in the Roman Senate from the consuls or chief magistrates to the censors. ... More

lex Papia Poppaea  

Jacob Giltaij

Online publication date:
Feb 2019
Subject:
Roman Law
The lex Papia Poppaea was enacted in 9 ce by the suffect consuls, M. Papius Mutilus and Q. Poppaeus Secundus, probably on the initiative of the Emperor Augustus. The law complemented, ... More

lex (P)Laetoria  

Peter Candy

Online publication date:
Jun 2018
Subject:
Roman Law
The lex Laetoria (or Plaetoria) was a law of the late 3rd or early 2nd century bce that gave special protection to minors. The law gave an action against persons who were alleged to have ... More

lex Poetelia Papiria  

Saskia Roselaar

Online publication date:
Jun 2017
Subject:
Roman Law
The lex Poetelia Papiria was a law that abolished the contractual form of nexum (debt bondage). Livy 8.28 dates the law to 326bce, during the third consulship of Gaius Poetelius Libo Visolus and the ... More

lex Publilia Philonis  

Charles Bartlett

Online publication date:
Jan 2018
The lex Publilia Philonis of 339bce addressed two issues of importance for the functioning of the Senate. The first concerned the auctoritas of the body, and did away with the practice of senatorial ... More

lex (Rubria) de Gallia Cisalpina  

Georgy Kantor

Online publication date:
Oct 2018
Subject:
Roman Law
The lex de Gallia Cisalpina is the usual modern title given to the fragment of a Roman statute on a bronze tablet found at the ancient town of Veleia in 1760, the surviving part of which deals with ... More

lex Valeria de provocatione  

Saskia Roselaar

Online publication date:
May 2017
Subject:
Roman Law
Provocatio was a method for appealing the decision of a Roman magistrate. Provocatio could occur after a normal trial had been conducted in front of a magistrate with ... More

lex Villia Annalis, 180 BCE  

James R. Townshend

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Subject:
Roman Law
The only direct reference to the law is by Livy (40.44.1), when he briefly summarizes the legislative and electoral activities for the year 180bce. Livy reports that in that year (eo anno) a bill was ... More

lex Voconia  

Ville Vuolanto

Online publication date:
Feb 2018
Subject:
Roman Law
The lex Voconia is a plebiscitum, named after the people’s tribune Q. Voconius Saxa, who proposed the bill before the concilium plebis (see comitia) in 169bce. It provides that testators of the first ... More

locatio conductio  

R. Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Locatio conductio was one of the four consensual *contracts of Roman law. It covered the hiring or leasing of things as well as contracts of employment in the form either of ... More

magister equitum  

A. N. Sherwin-White and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Magister equitum, ‘master of the horse’, an emergency magistrate nominated by the *dictator (who was in early times called magister populi). Apart from commanding the cavalry, he was the dictator's ... More

magister libellorum, 'master of petitions'  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Magister libellorum (‘master of petitions’), originally a libellis (‘secretary for petitions’), an officer on the Roman emperor's staff whose duty was to deal with written petitions from ... More

magistracy, Roman  

Peter Sidney Derow

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Magistrates at Rome may be divided in various ways according to various criteria. The most general recognizes a distinction between (a) the ordinarii (regularly elected), namely *consuls, *praetors, ... More

maiestas  

John Percy Vyvian Dacre Balsdon and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Maiestas, used as an abbreviation for the crime maiestas minuta populi Romani, ‘the diminution of the majesty of the Roman people’. This charge was first introduced by L. *Appuleius Saturninus' lex ... More

manceps  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Manceps has several meanings. Most commonly it denotes the successful bidder in an auction of contracts for the sale or leasing of state lands or for public works. The manceps in such contracts ... More

mancipatio  

Barry Nicholas and Alan Rodger

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
This was a solemn transaction with copper and scales, mentioned already in the *Twelve Tables. By historical times it was a symbolic transaction, but it retained the form of a sale, with the scales ... More

mandate  

R. Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
A mandate (mandatum) was one of the four consensual *contracts of Roman law. Based on the Roman notions of good faith, friendship, and moral duty (officium) (Dig. 17. 1. 1. 4), it dealt with ... More

manus  

Susan M. Treggiari and Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Manus was the power (akin to *patria potestas) which a husband might have over his wife. In early times it perhaps covered not only (as later) control of property, but the right, after due process, ... More

maritime loans  

Dominic W. Rathbone

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
In the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, centred as they were on the Mediterranean, maritime transport was far more practical than land transport for long- and even medium-distance trade. Most ships ... More

marriage ceremonies, Roman  

Gordon Willis Williams

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The favourite season was June. Usually on the previous day the bride put away her toga praetexta: she had come of age. Her dress and appearance were ritually prescribed: her hair was arranged in six ... More

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