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Summanus  

John Scheid

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Summanus, god who sends nocturnal thunderbolts (FestusGloss. Lat. 334). Latte (RR 208) derives the cult from an omen during the war with *Pyrrhus when a temple was founded (?276 bce), located ‘at the ... More

suovetaurilia  

J. Linderski

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Suovetaurilia (suovi-), a purificatory sacrifice at the conclusion of lustratio of three (generic) victims: pig, sheep, bull (sus, ovis, taurus). Suovetaurilia lactentia (‘suckling’) ... More

superstitio  

John Scheid

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Superstitio, though perhaps originally implying a positive attitude, had become pejorative by the end of the 1st cent. bce. Superstition meant a free citizen's forgetting his dignity by throwing ... More

supplication, Roman  

J. Linderski

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
When calamity struck (pestilence, defeat) or danger threatened, the senate, advised by priests, often decreed adoration by all the people, or part of it, especially women (Livy 25. 12. 15) of all or ... More

syncretism  

Richard Gordon

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Syncretism, originally a (negative) term for the eirenic theologies of Grotius (1583–1645) and Calixtus (1586–1656), was turned into a metaphor in the 1830s, apparently by J. H. Newman. ... More

tabularium  

Janet DeLaine

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
(1) The record-office at Rome (see archives (Roman)), possibly serving the adjacent *aerarium (treasury) of Saturn and built according to CIL 12. 737 by Q. *Lutatius Catulus(1) in 78 bce, but not ... More

Tages  

J. Linderski

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Tages, a figure of *Etruscan mythology, an example of puer senex, ‘aged child’, childlike in appearance but of divine wisdom. He sprang out during ploughing from a furrow near *Tarquinii, and ... More

Tarchon  

J. Linderski

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Tarchon, companion, son or brother of Tyrrhenus, founder of *Tarquinii, also of Pisa and Mantua (Lycoph. Alex. 1248; Cato, Orig. fr. 45 Peter; Strabo, 5. 219; Serv. Dan. Aen. 10. 198). The scene on a ... More

Tarquitius Priscus  

J. Linderski

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Tarquitius (RE 7) Priscus, an authority on ‘Etruscan lore’, Etrusca disciplina (see religion, etruscan). He appears to have lived at the end of the republic. *Macrobius (Sat. 3. 7. 2; 20. ... More

Tatian, Greek-speaking Christian philosopher  

Wolfram Kinzig

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Greek-speaking Christian philosopher from Mesopotamia and pupil of *Justin Martyr in Rome. After Justin's death he split from the Roman community (c. ce 172) and returned to the east where ... More

teletē  

H. S. Versnel

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Being related to τελεῖν (accomplish, finish), this word originally means no more than ‘accomplishment’, ‘performance’. However, already at its earliest occurrence (*Pindar), it had a special meaning: ... More

Tellus  

Herbert Jennings Rose and John Scheid

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Tellus, the Roman earth-goddess, probably very old, though her temple on the Esquiline dates only from 268 bce. (Ziolkowski, Temples 155 ff.). She should not be confused with *Ceres. According to ... More

temple  

Richard Allan Tomlinson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The Greek temple was the house of the god, whose image it contained, usually placed so that at the annual festival it could watch through the open door the burning of the sacrifice at the altar which ... More

temple officials  

John North

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Myth and Religion, Roman Myth and Religion
Greek and Roman temples served as the houses of gods and goddesses, but also as centres of religious activity, meeting-places, storehouses for dedications, and secure locations for the keeping of ... More

templum  

J. Linderski

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Templum, an augural term denoting (a) the field of vision defined by a ritual formula (templum in aere) to observe the (impetrative) auspices (see auspicium) from the flight of birds; ... More

templum Pacis  

Janet DeLaine

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Templum Pacis, later called forum Pacis or Vespasiani, was the precinct of the temple of Peace at Rome, dedicated by *Vespasian in 75 ce. The area (145×100 m.) was surrounded by marble ... More

Terminus  

Herbert Jennings Rose and John Scheid

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Terminus, a boundary-marker; in Roman religion, the god who protected these markers, which were set up with ceremony, sacrifices being made and blood and other offerings, with the ashes of the fire, ... More

Testamentum Porcelli  

Leofranc Holford-Strevens

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Latin Literature, Roman Myth and Religion
The purported will (4th cent. ce) of a piglet before slaughter at the Saturnalia, parodying the informal military will; beloved of schoolboys and deplored by Jerome, it expresses barbed ... More

theodicy  

David Potter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Theodicy is the effort to explain (a) phenomena appearing to demonstrate a divinity's hostility to virtuous people or to people whose actions suggest that they should expect to be recipients of ... More

Theophilus (3), of Alexandria (1), patriarch  

John F. Matthews

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Roman Myth and Religion
Theophilus (3) of *Alexandria (1), patriarch 385–412 ce, was no thinker but a zealous pastor who vigorously suppressed Egyptian paganism (he was instrumental in destroying the great temple of ... More

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