You are looking at  21-28 of 28 articles  for:

  • Roman History and Historiography x
Clear All

View:

Sempronius Gracchus (2), Tiberius, Roman censor, 169 BCE  

Ernst Badian

Published Online:
Mar 2016
Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus (2), nephew of Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus (1), served under L. *Cornelius Scipio Asiagenes in 190 bce, and as tribune 187 or 184 supported Scipio in his trial. (The ... More

Sempronius Gracchus, Tiberius (3), Roman tribune, 133 BCE  

Ernst Badian

Published Online:
Jul 2015
Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus, son of (2) and of *Cornelia, served at Carthage under his cousin P. *Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus, who married his sister. As quaestor in Spain (137 bce), he used his ... More

Sempronius Gracchus, Gaius  

Ernst Badian

Published Online:
Jul 2015
Gaius Sempronius Gracchus, younger brother of Ti. *Sempronius Gracchus (3), served under his cousin and brother-in-law P. *Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus at *Numantia. A member of his brother's land ... More

senate, regal and republican period  

Arnaldo Momigliano and Tim Cornell

In the time of the *Gracchi (c.133–121 bce) the senate was a body of around 300 wealthy men of aristocratic birth, most of them ex-magistrates. Although the sources tend to assume that this state of ... More

senators, patterns of recruitment  

Barbara Levick

Published Online:
Mar 2016
The emperor *Claudius pointed out in 48 ce (ILS212, trans. D. Braund, Augustus to Nero, no. 570) that newcomers had reigned in the regal period; the senate was never a closed body. Claudius' ... More

senatus consultum ultimum  

Arnaldo Momigliano and Andrew Lintott

Published Online:
Mar 2016
Senatus consultum ultimum ‘the ultimate decree of the *senate’, a modern term, deriving from Caes. BCiv. 1. 5, for what was in fact a declaration of emergency.This decree urged magistrates, usually ... More

tribunicia potestas  

T. Corey Brennan

Published Online:
Oct 2017
Tribunicia potestas (tribunician power) refers to the rights granted to Rome’s tribuni plebis—including sacrosanctity, that is, personal inviolability while in office—and ... More

tribuni plebis  

Peter Sidney Derow

Published Online:
Aug 2016
Tribuni plebis (or plebi), ‘tribunes’, were the officers of the plebs first created in 500–450bce (traditionally in 494, the date of the first secession of the plebs and their corporate recognition). ... More

View: