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Acraephnium  

John Buckler

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Acraephnium (mod. Karditza), city in NE *Boeotia, located above a small bay of Lake *Copais; perhaps the Homeric Arne. Fortifications and cemeteries have been excavated, the latter ... More

Acragas  

Arthur Geoffrey Woodhead and R. J. A. Wilson

Was founded c.580 bce by the Geloans (see gela) in Sican territory in central southern Sicily. One of the most substantial Hellenic cities in size and affluence, it occupied a large bowl of land, ... More

Acrisius  

Herbert Jennings Rose

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Acrisius, in mythology, son of Abas, king of *Argos (1), and his wife Aglaïa, father of *Danaë and brother of *Proetus. After Abas' death the two brothers quarrelled; in their warfare they invented ... More

acrostic  

Don P. Fowler and Peta G. Fowler

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Acrostic (Gk. ἀκροστιχίς, ἀκροστίχιον), a word or phrase formed from the initial letters of a number of consecutive lines of verse. Acrostics may occur by chance (Eust. Il. 24. 1; Gell.NA 14. 6. 4; ... More

acta  

John Percy Vyvian Dacre Balsdon and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Acta means ‘the things that have been done’ and has two specialized, overlapping senses in Roman history; one is a gazette, the other is official acts, especially of an emperor.The Acta diurna were a ... More

Actaeon  

Herbert Jennings Rose and Jenny March

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Actaeon, in mythology son of *Aristaeus and Autonoë, daughter of *Cadmus, and a great huntsman. Ovid gives the most familiar version of his death (Met. 3. 138 ff.): one day on Mt. Cithaeron he came ... More

actio  

Thomas Rüfner

Online publication date:
Nov 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
In Roman law, the word actio refers to a civil lawsuit. At first sight, it seems obvious that actio derives from the verb ago, which has the basic meaning “to drive,” “to urge,” or simply “to act.” ... More

Actium  

W. M. Murray

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Actium (Ἄκτιον), a flat sandy promontory at the entrance to the Ambracian Gulf, forming part of the territory of Anactorium, as well as the NW extremity of *Acarnania. A cult of Apollo was located ... More

Acts of the Apostles  

Christopher Rowland

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Christianity
The second of two volumes which continues the story of the rise and spread of *Christianity begun in the gospel of Luke. Its textual history poses peculiar interpretative problems as it is extant in ... More

Acts of the Pagan (or Heathen) Martyrs  

Edith Mary Smallwood and M. T. Griffin

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Is the name given by modern scholars to about a dozen fragments of Alexandrian nationalist literature, preserved on papyri mostly written in the 2nd or early 3rd cent. ce. The majority of the ... More

Acusilaus  

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Acusilaus, of Argos, lived ‘before the *Persian Wars’ (Joseph. Ap. 1–13) and compiled *genealogies, translating and correcting *Hesiod, with ingenious conjectures but no literary merit. ... More

Ada  

Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Near East
Ada, *satrap (see mausolus) of the Persian province of *Caria, youngest child of *Hecatomnus, sister of *Mausolus and of *Idrieus, to whom she was incestuously married and with whom she ... More

adaeratio  

Arnold Hugh Martin Jones and Michael Crawford

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Adaeratio, the procedure whereby dues to the Roman state in kind were commuted to cash payments. The related word adaerare first appears in ce 383 (Cod. Theod. 7. 18. 8) and the practice is ... More

Adamklissi  

John Wilkes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Adamklissi, the site of three Roman monuments in the Dobrudja plain (South Romania): (1) an altar (16.2 m. (53 ft.) square and c.6 m. (20 ft.) high) recording legionary and auxiliary casualties, ... More

adeia  

Arnold Wycombe Gomme and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
Adeia, ‘immunity’, sometimes in Greece offered to men accused of involvement in a crime who were willing to inform on others (e.g. *Andocides in Athens' religious scandals of 415 bce). In Athens the ... More

Adiabene  

Margaret Stephana Drower, Eric William Gray, and Susan Mary Sherwin-White

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Near East
Adiabene (mod. Halab), district of the two Zab rivers in north *Mesopotamia. Possibly a Seleucid hyparchy, it became a vassal kingdom, later a satrapy, of *Parthia, and was constantly involved in ... More

adlection  

John Percy Vyvian Dacre Balsdon and Barbara Levick

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
A man acquired the right of speaking in the Roman senate (ius sententiae dicendae; see senate) by holding a magistracy, the quaestorship; he became a full member when his name was placed on the ... More

Adonis  

V. Pirenne-Delforge and André Motte

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Name given by the Greeks to a divine personage whom they thought to be eastern in origin (Semitic Adon = ‘Lord’), but whose eastern prototypes (Dumuzi, Tammuz, Baal, Ešmun) are very different from ... More

adoption, Greek  

Mark Golden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
Greeks counted on their heirs for support in old *age, and for continuation of their oikoi (families) and tendance of their tombs after death. But high mortality ensured that many had no surviving ... More

adoption, Roman  

Adolf Berger, Barry Nicholas, and Susan M. Treggiari

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Adoptio is a legal act by which a Roman citizen enters another family and comes under the *patria potestas of its chief. Since only a paterfamilias (see patria potestas) could adopt, women could not ... More

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