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Vibius Pansa Caetronianus, Gaius, Roman general and politician  

Christopher Pelling

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Roman general and politician who served with *Caesar in Gaul, defended his interests as tribune in 51 bce (see tribuni plebis), governed *Bithynia in 47–6 and Cisalpine Gaul (see gaul (cisalpine)) in ... More

Vibius Rufus, Gaius  

M. Winterbottom

Online publication date:
Mar 2016

Declaimer (perhaps C. Vibius Rufus Rufinus, *suffect consul 16 ce). L. *Annaeus Seneca(1), who quotes him frequently, records that he spoke ‘in the old way’ (Controv. 9. 2. 25).

Vibius Sequester  

David Paniagua

Online publication date:
Apr 2019
Vibius Sequester is the author of the De fluminibus, fontibus, lacubus, nemoribus, paludibus, montibus, gentibus per litteras, a short repertoire of geographical names mentioned by Virgil, ... More

Vibius Trebonianus Gallus, Gaius, Roman emperor Trebonianus Gallus  

John Frederick Drinkwater

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Gaius Vibius Trebonianus Gallus,the emperor Trebonianus Gallus, ruled 251–3 ce. A successful senatorial governor of *Moesia, he was acclaimed by the army immediately after *Decius' death. ... More

vicarius  

R. S. O. Tomlin

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
During the first two cents. ce, vicarius meant a substitute for an absent or deceased provincial governor. In the 3rd cent. vicarii were the equestrian *procurators of provinces who were specially ... More

vicomagistri  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Vicomagistri, officials of a *vicus, which was a miniature body politic, and was entitled to possess property, administer common funds, and appoint officials. These magistri or vicomagistri, who were ... More

victimarius  

Herbert Jennings Rose and John North

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Sacrificial slaughterer; see sacrifice, roman. The magistrate in charge of a sacrifice did not perform the act of killing himself; he performed symbolic acts and pronounced the prayers, ... More

Victoria  

Herbert Jennings Rose and John Scheid

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The Roman equivalent of *Nike. There is no evidence that she is anything more; mentions of an early cult of Victory must refer to Vacuna or Vica Pota (Dion. Hal.Ant. Rom. 1. 15. 1; Asc.Pis., p. 13. ... More

Victorinus, Marcus Piavvonius  

John Frederick Drinkwater

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Praetorian prefect (see praefectus praetorio) of the Gallic usurper, *Postumus, whom he succeeded in 269 AD after the ephemeral reign of Marius. Though he abandoned *Spain and lost eastern ... More

Victorinus, Marius, c. 285–c. 365 CE  

Stephen A. Cooper

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Christianity
Marius Victorinus is one of the few direct links between the Platonist schools of late antiquity and Latin theology. A professor of rhetoric in mid-4th century Rome, Victorinus is perhaps ... More

vicus  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Vicus, ‘village’, one of a series of Roman terms for settlements of lower status than towns (such as *pagus). In administrative law the term was used for places with recognizably ... More

Vienna  

John Frederick Drinkwater

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Vienna (mod. Vienne), a town in Gallia Narbonensis (see gaul (transalpine)), *civitas-capital of the *Allobroges. Perhaps created a colonia Latina by *Caesar, it was made a full colony by *Gaius(1) ... More

vigiles  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Ancient cities made various arrangements for maintaining security at night; bands of night-wardens (nuktophulakes) were more often aimed at the prevention of sedition than the protection of property ... More

vigintisexviri, vigintiviri  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Six boards of minor magistrates at Rome were known by the collective designation vigintisexviri (the Twenty-Six) in the late republic: membership was a precursor to the quaestorship and the beginning ... More

villa  

David J. Mattingly

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Villa was the Latin word for a rural dwelling associated with an estate, and ranging in character from functional farms to the luxurious country seats of the élite (Varro, Rust. 1. 11. 1–12. 4; 3. 2. ... More

Villanovan culture  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Villanovan culture takes its name from the Bolognese estate owned by G. Gozzadini, who in 1853 excavated nearby the first of many iron age cemeteries in the modern provinces of Bologna, Faenza, ... More

Villius (Annalis), Lucius  

T. Corey Brennan

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Lucius Villius(Annalis), tribune of the plebs in 180 bce (see tribuni plebis), passed the first law to stipulate minimum ages for tenure of each (curule) magistracy (42 for the ... More

Viminacium  

John Wilkes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Viminacium (mod. Kostolac), on the Danube east of Belgrade, was a Celtic settlement (see celts) which became a legionary fortress and city in *Moesia Superior. Its permanent garrison (probably from ... More

Viminal  

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

One of the *Seven hills of Rome. It lay between the *Esquiline and the *Quirinal.

Vinalia  

C. Robert Phillips

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Roman wine festivals on 23 April (Priora), 19 August (Rustica). The Priora probably offered *Jupiter new wine at the time of sale (Plin.HN 18. 287, fasti Praenestini); Ov.Fast. 4. 863 ff. ... More

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