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Triphiodorus, of Panopolis  

Laura Miguélez-Cavero

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Triphiodorus, who originated from Egypt and lived in the 3rd century ce, was an epic poet and teacher of grammar whose only extant work is The Sack of Troy (691 lines, narrating the final events of ... More

Troy  

Carl W. Blegen and D. F. Easton

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Troy lies in north-west *Asia Minor 5 km. from the *Hellespont. The site consists of a mound with c. 25 m. of deposits and a 1 km. sq. skirt to the south. It was noted by F. Kauffer (1793), ... More

Tryphon (2), Greek grammarian, late 1st cent. BCE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Tryphon (2), son of Ammonius, an important Greek grammarian from *Alexandria(1) (late 1st cent. bce). His works, which were used by his contemporary *Didymus(1), by *Apollonius(13) ... More

Tynnichus, of Chalcis, early 5th cent. BCE?  

Bernhard Zimmermann

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Tynnichus (early 5th cent.?), poet of *Chalcis, whose reputation rested on a *Paean, of which one line was admired by *Aeschylus (test. 114 Radt = Porphyrius 2. 18, p. 148 Nauck) and by ... More

Tyrannio (1), 'the Elder', Aristarchan teacher at Rome, early 1st cent. BCE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes, Robert Browning, and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Theophrastus, son of Epicratides, of *Amisus (where his teacher nicknamed him Tyrannio), afterwards a pupil of *Dionysius (15) Thrax, was brought by L. *Licinius Lucullus (2) as prisoner to Rome, ... More

Tyrannio (2) , 'the Younger', grammarian, 1st cent. BCE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Tyrannio (2) the Younger, son of Artemidorus, a *Phoenician, originally named Diocles, was brought as a prisoner to Rome and freed by *Terentia, the widow of *Cicero. He was a pupil of ... More

Tyro  

Richard Hunter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature, Greek Myth and Religion
Tyro, in mythology, daughter of *Salmoneus and mother (by Cretheus) of *Jason(1)'s father Aeson and (by *Poseidon) of the twins *Pelias and *Neleus. Tyro loved the river *Enipeus, but Poseidon ... More

Tyrtaeus  

Martin Litchfield West

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Tyrtaeus, Spartan elegiac poet of the mid-7th cent. bce. His works are said to have filled five books; some 250 lines or parts of lines survive in quotations and papyri. They are of great historical ... More

Tzetzes, Johannes, 12th cent. CE  

Peter Barr Reid Forbes, Robert Browning, and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature, Late Antiquity
Johannes Tzetzes (12th cent. ce), a copious, careless, quarrelsome Byzantine polymath. In his youth he wrote (ce 1143) a commentary on *Homer's Iliad of which the greater part is still unpublished, ... More

Ulpianus, of Ascalon  

Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature, Late Antiquity
Ulpianus of Ascalon taught rhetoric at *Emesa and *Antioch (1) in the reign of Constantine (324–37 ce) and wrote a number of declamations and rhetorical works (no longer extant). He is the reputed ... More

Uranius, Greek writer about Arabia  

Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Jun 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature, Late Antiquity, Near East
His date is not quite certain, but 4th century ce (rather than three centuries earlier) seems likeliest. He is a source for much of the Arabian information in Stephanus of Byzantium, in ... More

warfare, attitudes to, Greek and Hellenistic  

Michel Austin

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Homer'sIliad, a poem about war, does not glorify war: it celebrates martial prowess but also portrays the sufferings caused by war, and *Ares, god of war, is rebuked by Zeus as the most hateful of ... More

Xanthus (1), Greek poet  

P. J. Parsons

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Poet mentioned by *Stesichorus, who adapted many works from him, including the Oresteia; he presented *Heracles in his Homeric guise, and said that Laodice (cf. Il. 9. 145) was renamed Electra ... More

Xenarchus (1), Sicilian mime-writer  

Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature

Sicilian mime-writer (see mime) of the late 5th cent. bce, son of *Sophron.

Xenarchus (2), Middle Comedy poet  

Geoffrey Arnott

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Xenarchus (2), a frank and lively Middle Comedy poet (see comedy (greek), middle). Eight titles survive, mainly from daily life. Fr. 1: a parody of tragic style; 4: young men's sexual ... More

Xenocles  

Andrew Brown

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Xenocles, son of the elder *Carcinus(1), was a tragic poet who defeated *Euripides in 415 with his Oedipus, Lycaon, Bacchae, and Athamas (satyric). His Licymnius is parodied by *Aristophanes(1) ... More

Xenophanes, of Colophon, poet, theologian, and natural philosopher  

Charles H. Kahn

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature, Philosophy
Xenophanes of Colophon, poet, theologian, and natural philosopher, left Ionia (see ionians) at the age of 25, probably after the Persian Conquest in 545 bce, and led a wandering life for 67 years, ... More

Xenophon (1), Greek historian  

C. J. Tuplin

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Xenophon, son of Gryllus, from the Athenian *deme of Erchia, was born into a wealthy but politically inactive family around 430 bce. He presumably served in the cavalry (see hippeis (2) and (4)) and ... More

Xenophon (2), Greek novelist  

Ewen Bowie

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Greek novelist (see novel, greek), author of The Ephesian story of Anthia and Habrocomes (Τὰ κατὰ Ἀνθίαν καὶ Ἁβροκόμην Ἐφεσιακά). Mention (2. 13. 3) of an eirenarch, an office not attested before ... More

Zenodotus, of Ephesus, b. c. 325 BCE  

John Francis Lockwood, Robert Browning, and Nigel Wilson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Literature
Zenodotus of Ephesus (b. c. 325 bce), pupil of *Philitas, became the first head of the Library at *Alexandria (c. 284) and undertook the classification of the Greek epic and lyric poets, some of ... More

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