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Adrasteia  

Emily Kearns

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Adrasteia, a goddess apparently of the ‘mountain mother’ type, like *Cybele, associated with *Phrygia, but well known to the Greeks from a fairly early date. In the Phoronis, the *Idaean ... More

Adrastus (1), Greek epic hero  

A. Schachter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Adrastus (1), described in the Iliad as former king of *Sicyon (2. 572), was worshipped there at least until the 6th cent. (Hdt. 5. 67). Best known as the leader of the first Argive ... More

Adrastus (2), of Aphrodisias, Peripatetic philosopher, 2nd cent. CE  

Andrew Barker

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
RE, of Aphrodisias, *Peripatetic philosopher (2nd cent. ce). His influential writings included commentaries on the order of *Aristotle's works (mainly philological); on Nicomachean Ethics and ... More

Adrianus, of Tyre, c. 113–193 CE  

M. B. Trapp

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Adrianus (Hadrianus) of Tyre (c. CE 113–93), sophist, pupil of *Herodes Atticus; held the chairs of rhetoric at Athens and Rome. One short *declamation attributed to him survives. See ... More

Adriatic Sea  

Max Cary and W. M. Murray

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Adriatic Sea (Gk. ὁ Ἀδρίας; Lat. Mare adriaticum or superum), used as an alternative to ‘*Ionian Sea’ for the waters between the Balkan peninsula and Italy, and like ‘Ionian’, sometimes extended to ... More

Adulis  

Robert G. Morkot

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Near East
Adulis or Adule, on the west coast of the Red Sea (at Zulla in Annesley Bay near Massawa), was used by Ptolemy II and III for elephant-hunts (see elephants), and became an important ... More

adultery, Greek  

Mark Golden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
At Athens, a law (attributed to *Draco or *Solon) allowed a man who killed another he found in the sexual act with his wife, mother, sister, daughter, or concubine held for the purpose of bearing ... More

adultery, Roman  

Adolf Berger, Barry Nicholas, and Susan M. Treggiari

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Roman tradition ascribed to fathers and husbands great severity in punishing illicit sexual behaviour by daughters or wives. Such misconduct was stuprum in married or unmarried women, an offence ... More

advocacy  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
This article considers advocacy as a profession. For advocacy in its wider sense and in particular for its techniques, see rhetoric.A party to a Roman trial might entrust the presentation of his case ... More

Aeacus  

Alan H. Griffiths

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Aeacus (Αἰακός), ancestral hero of *Aegina, whose eponymous nymph bore him to *Zeus; to give him company, Zeus turned the island's ant population into humans, transforming murmēkes into ‘Myrmidons’ ... More

Aecae  

H. Kathryn Lomas

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aecae, *Daunian city 25 km. (15 ½ mi.) south-west of Foggia. A Roman ally, it defected to Hannibal in 216 bce but was recaptured. Colonies were founded under Augustus and Septimius Severus, and it ... More

Aedepsus  

Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aedepsus (mod. Loutra Aidepsou), Euboean coastal town dependent on *Histiaea, famous in antiquity for its hot springs, known to Aristotle (Mete. 2. 366a) and still in use. It prospered in ... More

Aedesius, d. c. 355 CE  

Anne Sheppard

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Of *Cappadocia, *Neoplatonist, pupil of *Iamblichus (2) and teacher of *Maximus (3) Chrysanthius, Priscus, and Eusebius Myndius. He set up a school of philosophy in Pergamum. No writings ... More

aediles, Roman magistrates  

A. N. Sherwin-White and Andrew Lintott

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
The aediles originated as two subordinates of the tribunes of the plebs whose sacrosanctity they shared. Their central function was to supervise the common temple (aedes) and cults of the plebs, ... More

aedituus  

Herbert Jennings Rose and John North

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aedituus (older form, aeditumnus), the keeper or sacristan of a consecrated building in Rome (aedes sacra). The word was applied to a wide range of officials, including both men of high ... More

Aëdon  

Herbert Jennings Rose

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Aëdon (Ἀηδών), in mythology, daughter of *Pandareos, the son of Hermes and Merope. She married Zethus and had two children, Itylus and Neïs. Envying *Niobe, Amphion's wife, for her many children, ... More

Aedui  

John Frederick Drinkwater

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Aedui, a highly developed *Celtic people who occupied most of modern Burgundy. They appealed to Rome against the *Arverni and *Allobroges (121 bce) and received the title of fratres consanguineique. ... More

Aegae  

Nicholas Geoffrey Lemprière Hammond

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
In northern Pieria, overlooking the coastal plain of Macedonia. Founded by the first of the Temenid kings and thereafter the site of their tombs, it has been made famous by Manolis ... More

Aegean Sea  

Eric Herbert Warmington

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aegean Sea, between Greece and Asia Minor. To it the modern name Archipelago was originally applied, but the ancient Greeks derived the name Aegean variously from *Theseus' father *Aegeus, ... More

Aegeus, Athenian hero  

Emily Kearns

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Aegeus, Athenian hero, father of *Theseus. As son of *Pandion and brother of *Pallas (2), *Nisus (1), and *Lycus (1), he received at the division of *Attica the area around Athens, although in ... More

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