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Carmen de ponderibus et mensuris  

Wilbur R. Knorr and Serafina Cuomo

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Carmen de ponderibus et mensuris (perhaps c.400 ce), a Latin didactic poem in 208 hexameter verses, once ascribed to *Priscian, but now attributed to one Rem(m)ius Favinus (or Flav[in]us), ... More

Cassius Dionysius  

William David Ross

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Cassius Dionysius of *Utica, wrote (1) (88 bce) a Greek translation (with additions) of the work of the Carthaginian Mago on agriculture, which became the standard work on the subject, used by all ... More

Cassius (1), Roman physician  

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine

A Roman physician of the time of Augustus and Tiberius (31 bce–37 ce). His specific for the relief of colic was famous in antiquity.

Cassius (2), doctor-sophist  

William David Ross and V. Nutton

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine

Doctor-sophist, the author of Ἰατρικαὶ ἀπορίαι καὶ προβλήματα φυσικά (‘medical puzzles and problems of physics’), not earlier than the 3rd cent. ce.

catoptrics  

Wilbur R. Knorr and Alexander Jones

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Catoptrics, a special field of *optics, is properly the geometric theory of the visual appearances of objects seen under reflection (anaklasis), but among the ancients also includes studies of ... More

Censorinus  

Alun Hudson-Williams and V. Nutton

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Censorinus (3rd cent. ce), a Roman grammarian (Prisc. 1. 4. 17), wrote On Accents (De accentibus, lost), and ‘a fine volume, on Birthdays’ (De die natali volumen illustre) (Sid. Apoll. Carm. 14 pref. ... More

Cetius Faventinus, Marcus  

Leofranc Holford-Strevens

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

Marcus Cetius Faventinus, (3rd–4th cent. ce), made a revised abridgement of *Vitruvius for builders of private houses; his work was used by *Palladius (1) and *Isidorus (2).

changing landscapes, human impact on  

John Bintliff

Online publication date:
Mar 2019
The Classical world witnessed many forms of physical landscape change due to long-term and short-term geological and climatological processes. There have also been alterations to the land ... More

changing landscapes, natural causes of  

John Bintliff

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
The classical world witnessed many forms of landscape change in its physical geography, mostly due to longer-term geological and climatological processes, whilst only a minority were due ... More

childbirth  

Gillian Clark

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Childbirth was generally the concern of women, either family and neighbours or experienced *midwives who were sometimes ranked as doctors, but male doctors expected to be called in for difficult ... More

Chrysermus  

Heinrich von Staden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Chrysermus (fl. mid-1st cent. bce?), Alexandrian physician of the ‘school’ of *Herophilus. The extant evidence, transmitted principally by *Galen and *Pliny (1) the Elder, concerns his pulse theory ... More

Claudius Thrasyllus, Tiberius  

G. J. Toomer

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Tiberius Claudius Thrasyllus, of *Alexandria (1), astrologer (d. 36 ce), owed his great reputation to the emperor *Tiberius, who, meeting him in *Rhodes, brought him to Rome, trusted his ... More

Cleomedes  

G. J. Toomer

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Wrote (perhaps c.360 ce) a treatise on astronomy, Κυκλικὴ θεωρία [μετεώρων] ‘Elementary Theory [of the Heavens]’. Although disordered and often trivial, the work is valuable for what it preserves ... More

Cleonides  

Andrew Barker

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine

Cleonides (perhaps 2nd cent. ce). His Introduction to Harmonics is an unusually reliable compendium of *Aristoxenus' basic doctrines.

climate  

Robert Sallares

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
The ancient climate was very similar to the modern climate. The Mediterranean climate is characterized by cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. There is a very high degree of interannual climatic ... More

clocks  

Robert Hannah

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Time, or the passage of time, was told through a variety of means in antiquity—via one’s own body, through the actual or calculated movement of celestial bodies (sun, moon, and stars), and ... More

conic sections  

Michael N. Fried

Online publication date:
Feb 2019
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
The curves known as conic sections, the ellipse, hyperbola, and parabola, were investigated intensely in Greek mathematics. The most famous work on the subject was the Conics, in eight ... More

Conon (2), of Samos, Greek mathematician and astronomer, 1st half of 3rd cent. BCE  

G. J. Toomer

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Conon of *Samos (first half of 3rd cent. bce), mathematician and astronomer. After observing star-risings and weather phenomena in Italy and Sicily, he became famous by his identification ... More

constellations and named stars  

G. J. Toomer and Alexander Jones

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
From the earliest times the Greeks, like many other peoples, named certain prominent stars and groups of stars. Homer speaks of the Pleiades, the Hyades, Orion, Boötes, the Bear (‘also called the ... More

Cornelius Celsus, Aulus  

J. T. Vallance

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Science, Technology, and Medicine
Cornelius Celsus, Aulus, lived in the reign of *Tiberius (14 ce–37), and wrote an encyclopaedia on the Artes, including books on agriculture, military science, rhetoric (and perhaps on philosophy and ... More

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