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incest  

Mark Golden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Incest, sexual intercourse or marriage with close kin, was restricted throughout classical antiquity. However, terminology and the particular relations prohibited varied with place and time. Though ... More

infanticide  

Robert Sallares

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Infanticide, killing of infants (ἔκθεσις, expositio, ‘putting outside’, probably a euphemism), a method of family limitation. The term as generally used by historians also covers exposure of infants, ... More

inheritance, Greek  

D. M. MacDowell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
In Athens, if a deceased man left legitimate sons, they shared the property equally; if a son predeceased his father leaving sons of his own, those sons inherited their father's share. If the ... More

Isaeus (1), Athenian speech-writer, c. 420–340s BCE  

John Davies

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
The skimpy ancient biographical tradition ([Plut.] Mor. 839e–f, *Dionysius(7) of Halicarnassus' critical essay Isaeus, and a Life preceding the speeches in the main MSS) preserves his father's name, ... More

Isocrates, 436–338 BCE  

George Law Cawkwell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Isocrates (436–338 BCE), Athenian orator of central importance. Although he lacked the voice and the confidence ever to address a large audience and so played no direct part in the affairs of the ... More

isonomia, 'equality of law'  

P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Seems, along with other compounds of iso-, to have been a prominent term in Greek political discourse in the late 6th and early 5th cents. bce. *Herodotus(1) uses isonomia in his Persian debate to ... More

isopoliteia, 'equal citizenship'  

Jakob Aall Ottesen Larsen and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Isopoliteia (‘equal citizenship’) is a term used from the 3rd cent. bce, either instead of politeia (‘citizenship’) for grants of *citizenship by a Greek state to individuals (e.g. IG 5. 2. 11 = ... More

judges, foreign  

Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Modern coinage to describe a judge or panel of judges (xenikon dikastērion) sent by one Greek city to hear lawsuits in another, often on the basis of a shared tie of *kinship (syngeneia). Attested ... More

kingship  

Oswyn Murray

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law, Philosophy
Kingship (basileia). The Mycenaean political system (see mycenaean civilization) was monarchic, with the king (wanax) at the head of a palace-centred economy; the 10th-cent. bce ‘hero's tomb’ at ... More

kinship  

S. C. Humphreys

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law, Philosophy
In antiquity constituted a network of social relationships constructed through marriage and legitimate filiation (including *adoption). It stretched beyond the *household (which usually included ... More

law in Greece  

Stephen Todd

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Modern work on this subject is conditioned by two important considerations. In the first place, it is Rome and not Greece which dominates European legal history: indeed, because the Greek world ... More

law, international  

Jakob Aall Ottesen Larsen and Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Under this heading law must be taken in its widest sense to include customary, religious, and moral law. Some approach to statutory law can be seen in the amphictionic laws (see ... More

legislation (nomothesia)  

Mirko Canevaro

Online publication date:
Jun 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek History and Historiography, Greek Law
From the earliest stages, the Greeks understood the distinction between legislation and day-to-day administration. They gave laws a special status and often created specific, separate ... More

logographers  

Lionel Pearson and Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
The word λογογράφος, as used by the contemporaries of *Demosthenes (2), commonly means a speech-writer for litigants in the courts, or else a writer of prose, as distinct from a poet (cf. Arist. Rh. ... More

Lycurgus (3), of Boutadai, Athenian orator and politician, c. 390–c. 325/324 BCE  

S. D. Lambert

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek History and Historiography, Greek Law
Lycurgus was one of the ten canonical Attic orators and an influential politician who worked energetically for the regeneration of Athens after the battle of Chaeronea (338) until his death, a period ... More

Lysias, Attic orator  

Stephen Todd

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
The ancient biographical tradition, that he was born in 459/8 and died c.380 bce ([Plut.] Vit. Lys. 835c, 836a; Dion. Hal. Lys. 1, 12), is clear but problematic. The latter date is plausible; the ... More

magistracy, Greek  

Victor Ehrenberg and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Magistracies (archai) in Greek states were the successors of the *kingships, which rarely survived into the Classical period. By a process which cannot now be followed in detail, and which the ... More

maritime loans  

Dominic W. Rathbone

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
In the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, centred as they were on the Mediterranean, maritime transport was far more practical than land transport for long- and even medium-distance trade. Most ships ... More

marriage ceremonies, Greek  

Christiane Sourvinou-Inwood

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Gender Studies, Greek Law, Greek Myth and Religion
Ceremonies were not identical all over Greece. For example, at Sparta they included a mock abduction (Plut.Lyc. 15. 3). But they were shaped by largely similar perceptions about the ceremony and the ... More

marriage law, Greek  

D. M. MacDowell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Gender Studies, Greek Law
Marriage in Greece was a process of transfer, by which the kyrios (‘lord’ or ‘controller’) of a woman (normally her father; if he had died, her nearest adult male relative) gave her away to another ... More

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