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adeia  

Arnold Wycombe Gomme and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Adeia, ‘immunity’, sometimes in Greece offered to men accused of involvement in a crime who were willing to inform on others (e.g. *Andocides in Athens' religious scandals of 415 bce). In Athens the ... More

adoption, Greek  

Mark Golden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Greeks counted on their heirs for support in old *age, and for continuation of their oikoi (families) and tendance of their tombs after death. But high mortality ensured that many had no surviving ... More

adultery, Greek  

Mark Golden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
At Athens, a law (attributed to *Draco or *Solon) allowed a man who killed another he found in the sexual act with his wife, mother, sister, daughter, or concubine held for the purpose of bearing ... More

Aeschines (1), c. 390–c. 322 BCE  

Edward Harris

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law, Greek Literature
Aeschines was an Athenian politician and orator. He came from a respectable family but was not a member of the wealthy elite. He worked as a secretary for the Council and Assembly, then as ... More

Agiads  

Paul Cartledge

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
The Agiads were the senior royal house at Sparta, descended mythically from the elder of Heraclid twins (Hdt. 6. 52; see heracles); the junior was known as the *Eurypontids. The origins of ... More

agoranomoi, Greek  

Alain Bresson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
The agoranomoi were the magistrates who, in the Greek cities, were in charge of policing and organizing the market. Their role was to make sure that transactions were conducted according to ... More

aisymnētēs  

Percy Neville Ure and Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Aisymnētēs, according to *Aristotle (Pol. 1285a), a supreme ruler appointed by some early city-states in times of internal crisis, for life, for a prescribed period, or till the completion of the ... More

amnesty  

Stephen Todd

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
To propose or demand the recall of *exiles was common throughout the Greek world, and attempts by such exiles to recover confiscated property frequently provoked further strife (e.g. Xen. Hell. 5. 3. ... More

Andocides, c. 440–c. 390 BCE  

George Law Cawkwell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
A member of a distinguished aristocratic family whose grandfather had been one of the ten Athenian envoys who negotiated the *Thirty Years Peace of 446. In 415, shortly before the great expedition to ... More

ankhisteia  

D. M. MacDowell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Ankhisteia (ἀγχιστεία), a kinship group, extending to second cousins, or perhaps only to first cousins once removed. In Athenian law the nearest relatives within this group had the right ... More

antidosis, 'exchange'  

D. M. MacDowell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
In Athens was a legal procedure concerned with *liturgies. Liturgies were supposed to be performed by the richest men. If a man appointed to perform one claimed that another man, who had ... More

Antiphon (1), Attic orator, c. 480–411 BCE  

Michael Gagarin

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Antiphon (1), of the *deme of *Rhamnus (c.480–411 bce), the first Attic orator whose works were preserved. From a prominent family, he participated in the intellectual movement inspired by the ... More

apodektai  

P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Ancient Economy, Greek Law
Apodektai (‘receivers’), at Athens, a board of officials who received the state's revenues and, in the 5th cent. bce, paid them into the central state treasury, in the 4th, apportioned them ... More

Apollodorus (1), Greek orator and litigant, c. 394–after 343 BCE  

Jeremy Trevett

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Apollodorus (1) (c.394–after 343 bce), the elder son of the Athenian banker *Pasion, was a minor politician and assiduous litigant. He is the speaker of seven speeches, wrongly attributed to ... More

arbitration, Greek  

Edward Harris and Anna Magnetto

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Ancient Economy, Greek Law
One of the most important decisions a litigant could make was the choice whether to submit his dispute to a private arbitrator or to go to trial. Private arbitration had several advantages ... More

archontes  

Arnold Wycombe Gomme and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Archontes (‘rulers’), the general Greek term for all holders of office in a state. But the word was frequently used as the title of a particular office, originally at least the highest office of the ... More

Areopagus  

Theodore John Cadoux and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Ancient Geography, Christianity, Greek Law
Areopagus, the ‘Hill of Ares’ (Ἄρειος πάγος) at *Athens, north-west of the Acropolis, and the ancient council associated with it. There are no substantial remains on the hill; the council's ... More

aristocracy  

Victor Ehrenberg and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
The term is applied by modern scholars to the regimes of early Greece in which states were ruled by the noble families which had emerged from the Dark Age with the most landed property and ... More

assembly, Macedonian  

R. M. Errington

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Mass assemblies are known from Macedonia under the monarchy only in times of crisis; since Macedonian crises were usually directly military or connected with a military operation, those assembling ... More

astynomoi  

Arnold Wycombe Gomme and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Oxford Research Encyclopedia:
Greek Law
Astynomoi (‘city magistrates’), an office found mostly in the Ionian states (see ionians). In *Athens there were five for the city and five for the *Piraeus, appointed by lot for one year. Their ... More

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