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date: 01 December 2020

Methods for Assessing Online Climate Change Communication, Social Media Discussion, and Behaviorlocked

  • Leona Yi-Fan Su, Leona Yi-Fan SuDepartment of Communication, University of Utah
  • Heather AkinHeather AkinAnnenberg Public Policy Center, University of Pennsylvania
  •  and Dominique BrossardDominique BrossardDepartment of Life Sciences Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Summary

In recent years, increased Internet access and new communication technologies have led to the development of online methods for gathering public opinion and behavioral data related to controversial issues like climate change. To help climate-change researchers better adapt to the new era of online-based research, a review of, and methodological applications for, prevailing Internet-based research methods are provided here. Online surveys have become more common in the last decade for several reasons, including their relatively low administration cost, the pervasiveness of Internet communication, and declining response rates associated with traditional survey methods. Experiments embedded within online surveys have also become a useful tool for examining the extent to which online communications influence publics’ attitudes and behaviors. Other research methods that have gained growing attention from scholars are content analyses of online communication using big data approaches. By mining the seemingly infinite amount of user-generated content extracted from different social media sites, researchers are able to analyze issue awareness, responses to instant news, and emerging sentiments. This article provides a detailed overview of these Internet-based research methods, including their potential advantages and pitfalls, their applications in the science-communication and climate-change research fields, as well as suggestions for future research.

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