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date: 26 November 2020

Networked Individualism, East Asian Stylelocked

  • Vincent ChuaVincent ChuaDepartment of Sociology, National University of Singapore
  •  and Barry WellmanBarry WellmanNetLab Network, University of Toronto

Summary

“Networked individualism” represents the phenomenon that people are managers of their own personal networks. Networked individualism in an East (and Southeast) Asian context draws attention to the significant role of Asian social institutions and culture in the patterning of personal communities. When compared to Western situations—particularly American—East Asian personal communities are just as vibrant and supportive. They have woven seamlessly with digital media, extend both near and far, and are rich in social support. There are several differences that make East Asian societies unique, such as their strong focus on kinship, the salience of hierarchical social capital, the culture of mutual monitoring occurring through strong ties (e.g., guanxi), and the accelerated rise of digital media in everyday life.

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