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date: 28 October 2020

Cybervettinglocked

  • Brenda L. BerkelaarBrenda L. BerkelaarDepartment of Mathematics and Industrial Engineering, Polytechnique Montréal, Université de Montréal
  •  and Millie A. HarrisonMillie A. HarrisonDepartment of Communication Studies, The University of Texas at Austin

Summary

Broadly speaking, cybervetting can be described as the acquisition and use of online information to evaluate the suitability of an individual or organization for a particular role. When cybervetting, an information seeker gathers information about an information target from online sources in order to evaluate past behavior, to predict future behavior, or to address some combination thereof. Information targets may be individuals, groups, or organizations. Although often considered in terms of new hires or personnel selection, cybervetting may also include acquiring and using online information in order to evaluate a prospective or current client, employee, employer, romantic partner, roommate, tenant, client, or other relational partner, as well as criminal, civil, or intelligence suspects. Cybervetting takes advantage of information made increasingly available and easily accessible by regular and popular uses and affordances of Internet technologies, in particular social media. Communication scholars have long been interested in the information seeking, impression management, surveillance, and other processes implicated in cybervetting; however, the uses and affordances of new online information technologies offer new dimensions for theory and research as well as ethical and practical concerns for individuals, groups, organizations, and society.

Subjects

  • Communication Studies
  • Communication Studies
  • Communication Studies
  • Communication Studies
  • Communication Studies

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