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date: 24 February 2024

Media Literacy Education for Diverse Societieslocked

Media Literacy Education for Diverse Societieslocked

  • Annamária Neag, Annamária NeagDepartment of Media Studies, Charles University
  • Çiğdem BozdağÇiğdem BozdağDepartment of Media and Journalism Studies, University of Groningen
  •  and Koen LeursKoen LeursDepartment of Media and Cultural Studies, Utrecht University

Summary

Since the 1980s, media literacy has been a central topic in the field of communication, media, and education studies as a result of a parallel growth of polarization between societal groups and use of digital technologies for self-representation. In this article, we present a brief overview of the evolvement of media literacy and other competing terms and discuss emerging approaches that incorporate issues related to the politics of difference, representations and voice of marginalised groups. Although existing concepts and projects focus on singular aspects such as representation and media production by minorities, they do not commonly integrate concerns of diversity and media literacy education from a critical and holistic perspective. Building on critical pedagogy, feminist and decolonial theory, there is a need for a more inclusive and intersectional approach to media literacy education. Such an approach should focus not only on marginalized groups but also on society as a whole, it should advocate a critical understanding of the mediated construction of reality and offer grounds to successfully challenge dominant representations, and it should equip people with the skills not only to participate and raise their own voices but also to pay more attention to practices of listening to work toward a level playing field between mainstream and marginalized groups.

Subjects

  • Critical/Cultural Studies
  • Media and Communication Policy

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