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date: 08 December 2022

Divorce and Relational Terminationlocked

Divorce and Relational Terminationlocked

  • Madeleine Redlick HollandMadeleine Redlick HollandDepartment of Communication Studies, The University of Texas at Austin
  •  and Pamela J. LannuttiPamela J. LannuttiCenter for Human Sexuality Studies, Widener University

Summary

Given that the legalization of same-sex marriage at the federal level is a relatively new phenomenon, it is not surprising that research related to divorce and dissolution of LGBTQ+ relationships is in the early stages of its development. Research has begun identifying unique factors that may place LGBTQ+ relationships at increased risk of dissolution, including minority stress, lack of resources, and nontraditional relational arrangements. Additionally, nuances in the experience of dissolution that LGBTQ+ people may face have begun receiving scholarly attention, such as a lack of general awareness of LGBTQ+ divorce. This research has further revealed that the relationships that ex-partners may develop after romantic relationship dissolution carry different expectations, norms, and forms than those associated with non-LGBTQ+ relationships. There is still much room for growth and exploration in this area. Specifically, future researchers might consider integrating perspectives that move away from minority stress theory or qualitative research methods.

Subjects

  • Gender (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Studies)

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