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date: 18 April 2024

Police Legitimacy, Procedural Justice, and Formal Social Controllocked

Police Legitimacy, Procedural Justice, and Formal Social Controllocked

  • Robert E. Worden, Robert E. WordenJohn F Finn Institute for Public Safety Inc; School of Criminal Justice, University at Albany, SUNY
  • Beau P. HolladayBeau P. HolladayJohn F Finn Institute for Public Safety Inc; School of Criminal Justice, University at Albany, SUNY
  •  and Sarah J. McLeanSarah J. McLeanJohn F Finn Institute for Public Safety Inc

Summary

Procedurally just policing (PJP) has been hailed as a path to greater police legitimacy—which is to say, public trust and confidence in police and a sense of obligation to defer to police and obey the law. Greater police legitimacy is expected to lead to improved public cooperation with law enforcement, such as in reporting crime and calling the police. PJP entails treating people with respect, allowing them “voice,” and demonstrating that their needs and concerns have been taken into account and that police decisions rest on facts and the law. Police agencies can promote PJP by training officers, deploying body-worn cameras, and enhancing the fairness with which officers are treated by the organization. Empirical evidence on these expectations is mixed and raises a number of issues that preclude causal inferences, calling for a careful assessment of research methods and findings.

Subjects

  • Policing

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