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date: 31 October 2020

Global Security Surveillancelocked

  • Keith GuzikKeith GuzikDepartment of Sociology, University of Colorado, Denver
  •  and Gary T. MarxGary T. MarxDepartment of Sociology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Summary

Recent literature at the intersections of surveillance, security, and globalization trace the contours of global security surveillance (GSS), a distinct form of social control that combines traditional and technical means to extract or create personal or group data transcending national boundaries to detect and respond to criminal and national threats to the social order. In contrast to much domestic state surveillance (DSS), GSS involves coordination between public and private law enforcement, security providers, and intelligence services across national borders to counteract threats to collectively valued dimensions of the global order as defined by surveillance agents. While GSS builds upon past forms of state monitoring, sophisticated technologies, the preeminence of neoliberalism, and the uncertainty of post–Cold War politics lend it a distinctive quality. GSS promises better social control against both novel and traditional threats, but it also risks weakening individual civil liberties and increasing social inequalities.

Subjects

  • Theories of Crime
  • Dimensions of Crime
  • International and Comparative Criminology

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