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date: 01 December 2020

Making Gender-Responsive Programming More Queer Responsivelocked

  • Lindsay L. KahleLindsay L. KahleDepartment of Sociology and Anthropology, West Virginia University
  •  and Jill RosenbaumJill RosenbaumDivision of Politics, Administration, and Justice, California State University, Fullerton

Summary

The emergence of feminist criminology several decades ago heralded the creation of theoretical and justice-involved spaces that are specifically centered and tailored to the unique needs of women. More specifically, this shift turned attention to issues that weren’t typically discussed, for example, female victims and offenders, male battery, and sexual assault, as well as sexual and familial violence. One of the greatest contributions made by feminist criminology is gender-responsive programming, which recognizes that unique “pathways to delinquency” exist for girls and that these pathways often involve trauma and abuse. As a result, this type of programming attends to the specific needs of girls and young women, as they differ from those of boys and young men. Although research shows that these programs work to improve the lives of girls, they often overlook how sexual orientation—as it intersects with gender—often compounds such pathways altogether.

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