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date: 06 December 2022

Aging in Prison and Correction Policy in Global Perspectiveslocked

Aging in Prison and Correction Policy in Global Perspectiveslocked

  • Tina Maschi, Tina MaschiGraduate School of Social Service, Fordham University
  • Keith Morgen, Keith MorgenPsychology and Graduate Counseling Programs, Centenary University
  • Annette HintenachAnnette HintenachGraduate School of Social Service, Fordham University
  •  and Adriana KayeAdriana KayeGraduate School of Social Service, Fordham University

Summary

There has been a growing awareness among academic and professional communities, as well as the general public, of the global rise in the number of aging prisoners across the world. Both the scholarly literature and social media have documented the high human, social, and economic costs of housing older adults with complex physical, mental health, legal, and social needs. It is imperative to explore the crisis and select correctional policies and practices that have contributed to the rise in the aging and the seriously and terminally ill populations in global prisons. A comparative framing and analysis across the globe show how some countries, such as the United States, have a higher per capita rate of incarcerating older adults in prisons compared to other countries, such as Northern Ireland. Variations in profiles and manifestations of personal and social conditions affect pathways to prison for some older adults. Explanatory perspectives describe why some individuals are at an increased risk of growing old in prison compared to other individuals. Indigeneity, globalization, race and ethnicity, power and inequality, and processes of development and underdevelopment have affected the growth of the aging prison population. Promising practices have the potential to disengage social mechanisms that have contributed to the mass incarceration of the elderly and engage a more compassionate approach to crime and punishment for people of all ages, their families, and communities.

Subjects

  • Corrections
  • International Crime
  • Policing

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