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date: 18 April 2024

Green Cultural Criminology: Foundations, Variations and New Frameslocked

Green Cultural Criminology: Foundations, Variations and New Frameslocked

  • Anita Lam, Anita LamDepartment of Social Science, York University
  • Nigel SouthNigel SouthNigel South, Department of Sociology, University of Essex; School of Justice, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology
  •  and Avi BrismanAvi BrismanSchool of Justice Studies, College of Justice and Safety, Eastern Kentucky University; School of Justice, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology; Newcastle Law School, Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle

Summary

Green cultural criminology (GCC) is a hybridized, interdisciplinary approach, drawing upon general propositions associated with green criminology and cultural criminology. Whereas green criminology is concerned with crimes and harms affecting the natural environment and the planet, including their associated impacts on human and nonhuman life, cultural criminology is focused on the ways and means by which crime and crime control are socially constructed, enforced, represented, and resisted. The directions of GCC are wide-ranging and can be expressed as forms of inquiry about (a) media and popular cultural representations of environmental harms, crimes, and disasters, including how difference, deviance, and resistance are constructed in regard to environments and spaces; (b) the dynamics and constructions of consumption, especially with respect to the commodification of nature; and (c) the contestation of space, transgression, and resistance in relation to environmental harms. Over time, variations in GCC have emerged to explore how the cultural production of meanings—namely meanings associated with environment, human, and nonhuman species along with the connections and linkages between them—structures and informs the various ways that we conceive and make sense of, think and feel about, as well as act toward, interact with, and make decisions regarding the environment. To enhance existing ways of thinking about GCC in a post-pandemic world, four additional “cultural frames” are suggested for investigation and analysis: ekphrasis, elite consumption, commodification of nature, and Black Sky Thinking.

Subjects

  • Crime, Media, and Popular Culture
  • Criminological Theory
  • Critical Criminology

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